Are you sick of the way things are? Here is how to pray for revival.

then this happened

A new fire has broken out in Santa Rosa.  This time there will be now stopping it.  Stay tuned because the news of this new flare up is going to go national.  Read about how prayed for revival.

Sick of way things are?  Here is how to pray for revival.

By Mario Murillo

Habakkuk said it for all of us: “Lord, I have heard of your mighty acts and I stand in awe of them. Renew them in our day; in our time make them known; in wrath remember mercy.” (Habakkuk 3:2)

It is a special moment when you decide to pray for revival.  You actually enter into the same covenant with God of the heroes of faith in days past; you join the ranks of everyone from Habakkuk to Evan Roberts.

 

Let’s begin with a towering consolation:  God sought you for revival before you sought Him.   In fact, God is ever on the hunt for those who want to prove the power of prayer. “The eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose heart is fully committed to Him.” (II Chronicles 16:9) He seeks those who can spark a fire that will change the course of history.

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So what is it the first thing He looks for in a person who would pray for revival? He looks for desperation!  He seeks somebody who cannot bear the way things are.

 

In I Samuel: 14 Jonathan and his armor bearer faced a hopeless situation:  One million soldiers are coming against them, Jonathan has one of the last swords left in Israel, Israel’s army is just pitiful factions hiding in the holes and rocks.

 

The next thing that God looks for is conviction.

 

Something miraculous happens inside of Jonathan.  He is reduced to an unshakable conviction: “We are the people of God! We have a history of miraculous comebacks. Our God reigns!”  Jonathan and his armor bearer becomes the spark God needs.

 

Jonathan declares, “Let us go over to the outpost of those uncircumcised fellows. Nothing can hinder the Lord from saving, whether by many or by few!” And after a succession of amazing events that you must read for yourself, the chapter ends by saying: “God granted a great victory to Israel that day.”

 

You also face an impossible situation.  America is not just falling apart, she is disintegrating.  However, before you start praying you need an inner work.   America is a nation born out of an impossible situation and she can be saved by an impossible miracle.

 

Jonathan felt that he existed to bring victory.  God need not look any further. That is how you must approach revival intercession.

prayer woman

 

The home prayer gathering must undergo a revolution. No more cookies and coffee get-togethers where people hang out more than they pray.  We gather to rage against the evil of our time. We war in prayer expecting supernatural upheavals in our culture.  We are strictly there to meet God and receive power.

Why do I believe this will work?  I believe it because it always has worked and since Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever it will always work.

held over copy

 

Sick of way things are? Here is how to pray for revival.

sick

Sick of way things are?  Here is how to pray for revival.

By Mario Murillo

 

 

Habakkuk said it for all of us: “Lord, I have heard of your mighty acts and I stand in awe of them. Renew them in our day; in our time make them known; in wrath remember mercy.” (Habakkuk 3:2)

 

It is a special moment when you decide to pray for revival.  You actually enter into the same covenant with God of the heroes of faith in days past; you join the ranks of everyone from Habakkuk to Evan Roberts.

 

Let’s begin with a towering consolation:  God sought you for revival before you sought Him.   In fact, God is ever on the hunt for those who want to prove the power of prayer. “The eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose heart is fully committed to Him.” (II Chronicles 16:9) He seeks those who can spark a fire that will change the course of history.

iStock_000003894799Medium[1]

 

So what is it the first thing He looks for in a person who would pray for revival? He looks for desperation!  He seeks somebody who cannot bear the way things are.

 

In I Samuel: 14 Jonathan and his armor bearer faced a hopeless situation:  One million soldiers are coming against them, Jonathan has one of the last swords left in Israel, Israel’s army is just pitiful factions hiding in the holes and rocks.

 

The next thing that God looks for is conviction.

 

Something miraculous happens inside of Jonathan.  He is reduced to an unshakable conviction: “We are the people of God! We have a history of miraculous comebacks. Our God reigns!”  Jonathan and his armor bearer becomes the spark God needs.

 

Jonathan declares, “Let us go over to the outpost of those uncircumcised fellows. Nothing can hinder the Lord from saving, whether by many or by few!” And after a succession of amazing events that you must read for yourself, the chapter ends by saying: “God granted a great victory to Israel that day.”

 

You also face an impossible situation.  America is not just falling apart, she is disintegrating.  However, before you start praying you need an inner work.   America is a nation born out of an impossible situation and she can be saved by an impossible miracle.

 

Jonathan felt that he existed to bring victory.  God need not look any further. That is how you must approach revival intercession.

prayer woman

 

The home prayer gathering must undergo a revolution. No more cookies and coffee get-togethers where people hang out more than they pray.  We gather to rage against the evil of our time. We war in prayer expecting supernatural upheavals in our culture.  We are strictly there to meet God and receive power.

 

Why do I believe this will work?  I believe it because it always has worked and since Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever it will always work.

 

Atheism’s Fateful Flock.

Bill-O’Reilly

Atheism’s Fateful Flock.

By Bill O’Reilly for BillOReilly.com – Thursday, January 23, 2014

So an atheist walks into a church. If you’re waiting for the punch line, it’s not a joke. According to a recent AP report, something called “atheist mega-churches” are springing up across the USA. There’s music, talks about science, maybe a sermon, but one element is missing: God.

Atheism is chic. An organization called the Secular Student Alliance has more than 400 affiliates at American colleges and high schools, a 500% increase over the past few years. Another group, American Atheists, will hold its annual convention in April in Salt Lake City, right there amid the Mormon faithful. The group’s motto: “Think Again.” I would say the same to them.

Meanwhile, book stores are filled with authors declaring that “God is Not Great,” God is a “Delusion,” and you are a moron if you believe in the Deity. The secular press, of course, loves these books and the reviews are largely favorable.

That’s not to say there aren’t believers in the mainstream media. Soon after swimmer Diana Nyad completed her remarkable swim from Cuba to Florida last year, she described herself as an atheist who is in awe of “the beauty of this universe.” Oprah Winfrey got in hot water, pardon the expression, for informing Nyad that she is therefore not really an atheist.

Polling the folks about faith is tricky, but most surveys show that about 90% of Americans believe in God. Impressive, but that’s down from 98% in 1967. And younger people are less considerably likely to believe than their parents.

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Hollywood plays a role in this trend. According to the book Celebrities in Hell, a number of big stars may be aligned with the universe, but not with the force that most of us believe created it.

The book quotes the following:

– George Clooney: “I don’t believe in heaven or hell. I don’t know if I believe in God.”

– Angelina Jolie: “There doesn’t need to be a God for me.”

– Carrie Fisher: “I love the idea of God, but it’s not stylistically in keeping with the way I function.”

Indeed. Believing in God is not very stylish in mainstream media circles these days. The question then becomes, is there anything wrong with that? After all, we have freedom from religion in America; the Constitution makes it clear that no power in this country has the right to impose religion on anyone.

So the atheists have clear sailing, and I say: Thank God. People of faith should be challenged and made to think about their beliefs. Critical thinking in all areas makes your mind sharper, your philosophy stronger.

Back in 2007, I was looking forward to debating the most successful of the atheist proselytizers, Richard Dawkins, who wrote The God Delusion. He basically says that science can explain everything and no one has any direct evidence there is a God.

But I knocked him out in the fourth round with this right hook: “[The earth] had to come from somewhere, and that is the leap of faith you guys make – that it just somehow happened.”

Dawkins replied: “You’re the one who needs a leap of faith. The onus is on you to say why you believe in something … you believe in, presumably, the Christian God Jesus.”

“Jesus is a real guy,” I said. “I’m not positive that Jesus is God, but I’m throwing in with him rather than throwing in with you guys, because you guys can’t tell me how it all got here.”

“We’re working on it,” Dawkins said.

“When you get it,” I shot back, “maybe I’ll listen.”

But the atheists will never get it. The universe and the earth are so complex, so incredibly detailed, that to believe an accidental evolutionary occurrence could have led to the nature/mankind situation we have now requires a giant leap of imagination.

Richard Dawkins and I had a rematch a couple of years ago when he wrote a book aimed specifically at children. “The book is about science,” he told me, “and everything about the natural world can be explained by science.”

I chastised Dawkins for promoting atheism to youngsters. “You want children to reject God and religion,” I told him, “and you’re trying to get to the kids and say you’re an idiot if you believe in God.”

Richard Dawkins and all the other non-believers are free to think and say whatever they want. As long as they don’t attack people of faith and leave the kids out of it, I have no problem with them. As my eighth grade teacher Sister Martin once said, “Faith is a gift.” But not everybody gets to open the box.

Why I Believe Jesus is the Son of God.

Bill-O’Reilly

As one of the most visible and boisterous voices on all of cable news, Bill O’Reilly’s reputation is defined by his personality and politics more than his faith convictions. But I’ve long known O’Reilly apart from his public persona, and I’ve known there’s more to him than meets the eye.

With the release and success of the historical page-turnerKilling Jesus (which followed Killing Lincoln and Killing Kennedy, all co-authored with Martin Dugard), I was eager to explore the spiritual side of a Fox News star. These are the highlights of our conversation.

You grew up Catholic. How big of a role did faith play in your home?

I lived in a traditional Irish Catholic home that didn’t deviate very much from what had happened in the past 150 years. We went to church on Sunday, went out to breakfast afterward. There were rituals. My mother wanted me to be an altar boy, so I was. I can compare it to a very working-class, predictable, faith-based situation. It was just: Here are the rules. Here’s what we do. There wasn’t a lot of why in it.

Did you believe in God?

Yes, I bought into the orthodoxy. When you’re a little kid and your parents believe and then the school teaches you, it’s an inculcation. I didn’t challenge it.

And what about Jesus? Did you believe Jesus was the Son of God?

Oh, yes. Sure. Yes, back then in the late ’50s, early ’60s when I was in Catholic school, everybody believed it.

What do you believe now?

Pretty much the same. I’m much more sophisticated in my analysis of Roman Catholicism, but the theology I have no problem believing.

So what is God to you?

There’s an Intelligent Design in the universe that created the human race. And there is a free will component to every individual — you either choose to do good or you choose to do evil. And if you sit it out, then you’re in the evil category. And then, what you choose to do in your lifetime will be rewarded or punished by the Intelligent Designer of the universe.

I don’t want to be remembered. Once I’m gone, I’m gone. I don’t care.

That’s pretty much it. My philosophy is, generally speaking, if everybody followed Jesus’ teachings, then there wouldn’t be any war, wouldn’t be any strife, wouldn’t be any abuse. Everybody would be, not perfect, but certainly in a positive realm.

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And if I’m wrong, so what? I’m dead. It doesn’t matter. If it’s a positive while you’re alive to follow the Christian tenets, why would you not do so?

So you believe that Jesus was sent by God and—

I believe the whole narrative. I’m going to accept it, because there’s no reason not to.

I expected that Killing Jesus would be a religious book. In fact, it’s more like a history book. There was no sense of proselytizing.

No, I wanted to stay away [from that]. We have “A History” on the cover. I just wanted to make the world aware that this man existed.

I saw the 60 Minutes interview where you talked about how you believe that the Holy Spirit guided you to write this book. That comment was derided, but I wanted you to talk a little bit more about what you think your earthly purpose is and how your faith informs what you do.

The problem with the secular-progressive movement is it simply cannot accept any people of faith and take them seriously. They’re so condescending and they’re so arrogant that, even though you might be a brilliant person, if you believe, you’re an idiot. So that just knocks out the whole Jesuit organization. It knocks out Thomas Aquinas, Augustine. Everybody is knocked out because they believe. That’s what the genesis of the criticism was.

[P]riests are ridiculous. They don’t make it relevant. I don’t even listen to them. I just do on my own little deal.

When I was honest with 60 Minutes, I said, “Listen, I’m an ordinary guy.” I don’t consider myself to be extraordinary. I have ideas that come to me. And as a Christian, I believe those ideas, when they’re positive, come from the person who created me. And the person who created me is God, and in Christian theology, God is made up of three elements. So of course it would be the Holy Spirit. It’s all logical.

This is what all Christians, if they understand their faith, should believe. It’s not you [who is] creating this monumental book or song or hitting 500 home runs. It’s the talent that you’ve been given and that you’re blessed with. That’s what’s doing it.

So, I tried to get [that] across. I told the truth. I believe that these things that come into my mind — not only Killing Jesus but “The Factor” and the way that I’ve been able to build this whole media empire — is not me. I’m being directed to do it.

Now again, I could be wrong. Maybe it is me. But I don’t think so. I mean, I was an idiot kid, a stupid kid. What happened? All of a sudden I’m a genius? No. I’m being directed.

Why do you think that there is so much sneering and ridicule toward religion by people who don’t believe?

Because they don’t want to be judged. They believe that religious people are judging their behavior, and they don’t want to be judged. They want to do what they want.

Take a guy like Bill Maher. He’s probably the most visible atheist in the American media. Well, Bill Maher does not want to be told what to do. He wants to do whatever he wants. And if it’s take drugs, he wants to be able to do that. If it’s commit adultery, he wants to be able to do that. Whatever it may be, he doesn’t want anybody telling him not to. And the people that would do that would be religious people, so he strikes out against them.

I believe that these things that come into my mind — not only Killing Jesus but “The Factor” and the way that I’ve been able to build this whole media empire — is not me. I’m being directed to do it.

But his thinking is ridiculous. I saw him one time mocking the Virgin Mary in a very crude way, which he does. Am I offended? No. I understand where it’s coming from. But it’s stupid.

I’ve debated the most intellectual atheists in the world. The British guy. All the people who make an industry out of mocking people of faith. I’ve debated them all. And none of them can explain how the universe got here, how everything works so perfectly in nature, how the human body interacts, none of them, they have no clue. Despite all the science and all the technology, everything we have, they don’t know. Yet they have the nerve to mock people who believe that there’s something higher than human intellect?

It’s just appalling to me. But I don’t get into it so much. They’re free to believe what they want as long as they don’t try to hurt people — and some of them do. That’s when I step in.

People hurt other people in the name of religion, too. 

Certainly — look at the Muslim situation. And the real rabid Christians. And they’re going to be held accountable for that.

Have you ever had a crisis of faith?

Not really. I’m a simple man. I keep it really simple. Look, I was blessed with a lot of things. Can I give back an hour a week? I mean, is that too much to ask? And that time is well spent for me, by the way. I’m sitting there thinking about spiritual things. You know, getting outside myself and thinking about the big picture, what I can do better, projects that I can launch that will help people. I do that in church.

I don’t have any problem with people disliking me, and I’ll tell you why: Who was the most hated person in Judea 2,000 years ago?

And then I read the Scriptures. I read them and I think about them and then, when the priest is boring me into shreds — and these priests are ridiculous. They don’t make it relevant. I don’t even listen to them. I just do on my own little deal. But I think it’s worth an hour a week for me to get out of myself and go into the church. I like the whole ritual. I think it’s worthy. I think it’s good for me. And I’ve never in one part of my life not tried to get to church every Sunday.

You said you pray every night. What kind of prayers?

Just standard prayers. If there’s a bad thing happening, I’ll think about it and try to say,Give me a little inspiration here on how to handle this thing. I try to be humble enough to say, Look, I don’t have it right now and I need some help. And it usually comes.

You dedicated your book to those who love their neighbors as themselves. I thought a lot of the O’Reilly haters would be surprised to see that dedication.

They’ll never read it, though. The O’Reilly haters are pretty much the people that have no idea what I do. And I like that — I mean, I don’t have any problem with people disliking me, and I’ll tell you why. I’m not comparing myself, but who was the most hated person in Judea 2,000 years ago?

Many, many loved him, but just as many despised him. They’re always going to do that. If you speak your mind, you’re going to have some who like you and some who hate you.

What about you and your book dedication? Do you love your neighbor as yourself?

I’m the biggest sinner on the block, so I’m kind of in a difficult area saying what I do and don’t do. If you’re a Christian, you’re supposed to love the evildoers. If they do something bad to you, then you’re supposed to still love them.

I don’t do that. I’m a warrior. I don’t turn the cheek. I go after you if I think you’re hurting people. But I think that’s loving your neighbor.

See, by getting Jessica’s Law passed in 45 out of 50 states — and “The Factor” did that — I think that’s loving my neighbor. I’m taking these predators off the street. I’m not turning the cheek on them. I’m going after them. I think that’s my role. I’m a warrior/defender.

If there weren’t warriors to defend, then we would have been overrun a long time ago by the Third Reich, right? So it’s not as simple as what it’s sometimes made out to be. I’m comfortable in my role, but I would never say I’m the guy who loves my neighbor all the time, because sometimes I’m taking my neighbor apart. It’s kind of complicated.

You say you’re the biggest sinner of all. What are your sins?

Everything. I’m a volatile guy. I’m not a Holy Roller. I’m not a malicious guy, but I’m like everybody else. I’m fallible. I’m not going to tell you, Sally Quinn, what my sins are. But I’m certainly fallible and I don’t put myself up as any paragon of virtue.

When you’re going after somebody as a warrior, do you sometimes pull back and think,Maybe I’m being too tough on this person?

That’s a good question. My staff is under strict orders: we don’t go [after someone] unless we’re 100% sure. So I don’t have anything on my conscience in that realm. In 18 years, I haven’t had to retract or apologize to anybody other than one time we took something off a web site that was incomplete.

If there were no God, there would be some people who couldn’t do anything, but every human being, even people who are damaged, even people who have birth defects, Down syndrome, whatever it may be, everybody has a talent. Everybody.

When you’re interviewing somebody like Obama, and you’re asking tough questions, do you see them as an adversary? 

Depends what the interview is. With the Obama situation, I respect the president, but my job is to get as much information out of him as I can. With everybody else, and I mean everybody — I mean, I couldn’t do it with the pope, but besides the pope and President Obama — there’s nobody on earth where I would say [to myself], “Well, you can’t be assertive, you can’t be rude.” Those are the two people I can’t be rude to because of the office.

You come in and you start to lie or dance, I’m going to come after you. But with the president it’s different, because you have to respect the office. And I do. I respect him. But I’m not going to let him control the interview. That’s not happening.

Have you ever been to a silent retreat?

I haven’t. I’ve never been to a psychiatrist. I’ve never been to an analyst. I’ve never been to a silent retreat. I’m just not that introspective in the sense that I don’t do yoga, I don’t do TM [Transcendental Meditation]. I’m more active. But I respect people who do all that. It’s just not my style.

I don’t need a lot of help, so if I want to be silent, I’ll be silent by myself. I don’t have to go someplace.

Who do you admire?

I admire people who are making $40,000 a year and living an honest life. Life is hard. I don’t like phonies. I don’t like liars. I don’t like narcissists. I like the regular folks.

How would you like to be remembered?

I don’t want to be remembered. Once I’m gone, I’m gone. I don’t care.

Are you afraid of dying?

No, not at all. My time is up, I’m going.

Most people are looking for some kind of meaning in their lives. What gives you the most meaning in your life?

You find something that you like. Everybody’s born with talents, which is another reason I believe in God. If there were no God, there would be some people who couldn’t do anything, but every human being, even people who are damaged, even people who have birth defects, Down syndrome, whatever it may be, everybody has a talent. Everybody. So you find out what that talent is, and usually it corresponds to what you like to do. Then you work at that talent. You develop the talent. You make a living from the talent. That’s the key to having a meaningful life on the professional level.

My father was a very funny guy. I mean, he was hysterical. But he never used that talent and he was a low-level accountant. He didn’t make a lot of money and he was miserable. He’d go to work. He had to support his family, but he didn’t like his job. And I said to myself, I’m never going to be like that. I stuck to it.

Do you think that you’ll ever stop?

Yes, I do. I’m tired now, so I’ve got to cut it back soon. I just don’t know when that will be.

Piers Morgan and CNN Plan End to His Prime-Time Show

Piers Morgan and CNN Plan End to His Prime-Time Show

FEB. 23, 2014

Launch media viewer
Piers Morgan, shown in 2011, is British and struggled to connect with American viewers. The ratings for his live program suffered. Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

There have been times when the CNN host Piers Morgan didn’t seem to like America very much — and American audiences have been more than willing to return the favor. Three years aftertaking over for Larry King, Mr. Morgan has seen the ratings for “Piers Morgan Live” hit some new lows, drawing a fraction of viewers compared with competitors at Fox News and MSNBC.

It’s been an unhappy collision between a British television personality who refuses to assimilate — the only football he cares about is round and his lectures on guns were rife with contempt — and a CNN audience that is intrinsically provincial. After all, the people who tune into a cable news network are, by their nature, deeply interested in America.

CNN’s president, Jeffrey Zucker, has other problems, but none bigger than Mr. Morgan and his plum 9 p.m. time slot. Mr. Morgan said last week that he and Mr. Zucker had been talking about the show’s failure to connect and had decided to pull the plug, probably in March.

Crossing an ocean for a replacement for Larry King, who had ratings problems of his own near the end, was probably not a great idea to begin with. For a cable news station like CNN, major stories are like oxygen. When something important or scary happens in America, many of us have an immediate reflex to turn on CNN. When I find Mr. Morgan telling me what it all means, I have a similar reflex to dismiss what he is saying. It is difficult for him to speak credibly on significant American events because, after all, he just got here.

I received a return call from Mr. Morgan and was prepared for an endless argument over my assumptions. Not so. His show, he conceded, was not performing as he had hoped and was nearing its end.

“It’s been a painful period and lately we have taken a bath in the ratings,” he said, adding that although there had been times when the show connected in terms of audience, slow news days were problematic.

“Look, I am a British guy debating American cultural issues, including guns, which has been very polarizing, and there is no doubt that there are many in the audience who are tired of me banging on about it,” he said. “That’s run its course and Jeff and I have been talking for some time about different ways of using me.”

Mr. Morgan said that his show, along with much of the rest of CNN, had been imprisoned by the news cycle and that he was interested in doing fewer appearances to greater effect — big, major interviews that would be events in themselves. Although a change has long been rumored, it was the first time that both he, and the CNN executives I talked to, acknowledged that his nightly show was on the way out. Plans for a replacement at the 9 o’clock hour are still underway, but Mr. Morgan and the network are in talks about him remaining at CNN in a different role.

Mr. Zucker, the former chief of NBC, inherited Mr. Morgan from Jonathan Klein, his predecessor, but it is now his problem to fix. In the year he has been there, CNN has introduced promising shows around the edges and will be unveiling documentaries along the lines of the very successful “Blackfish” to run on Thursday in the 10 p.m. hour.

But the chronic troubles of prime-time remain. Sometime before the network “upfront” events in April, when advertisers buy commercial time for the fall season, Mr. Zucker needs to signal how he will fix CNN’s prime-time problem, and that begins with Mr. Morgan, whose contract ends in September.

Mr. Morgan has some significant skills that do translate across platforms and cultures. While working as a newspaper editor and television personality in Britain, he was involved in a number of controversies, but he developed a reputation as a talented, probing interviewer. In his current role, he has shown an ability not only to book big guests — former President Bill Clinton, Warren Buffett, the real Wolf of Wall Street among them — but also to dig in once they are on set.

“I think I can credibly do news and the ratings reflect that, but it is not really the show that I set out to do,” he told me. “There are all kinds of people who can do news here. I’d like to do work — interviews with big celebrities and powerful people — that is better suited to what I do well and fit with what Jeff is trying to do with the network.”

Old hands in the television news business suggest that there are two things a presenter cannot have: an accent or a beard. Mr. Morgan is clean shaven and handsome enough, but there are tells in his speech — the way he says the president’s name for one thing (Ob-AA-ma) — that suggest that he is not from around here.

There are other tells as well. On Friday morning, criticizing the decision to dismiss a cricket player, he tweeted, “I’m sure @StuartBroad8 is right and KP’s sacking will ‘improve performance’ of the England team. Look forward to seeing this at T20 WC.” Mr. Morgan might want to lay off the steady cricket references if he is worried about his credibility with American audiences. (His endless trolling of his critics on Twitter did not exactly help, either.)

People might point to Simon Cowell as a man with an accent and a penchant for slashing discourse that Americans loved, but Mr. Cowell is dealing with less-than-spontaneous musical performances, not signal events in the American news narrative. There was, of course, the counterexample ofDavid Frost, who did important work in news, but Mr. Frost did popular special reports and was not a chronic presence in American living rooms.

Mr. Morgan, who was chosen in spite of that fact that he had never done a live show, had the misfortune of sliding into the loafers of Mr. King, who, for all his limitations, was a decent and reliable stand-in for the average Joe.

In a sense, Mr. Morgan is a prisoner of two islands: Britain and Manhattan. While I may share his feelings about the need for additional strictures on guns, having grown up in the Midwest, I know that many people come by their guns honestly and hold onto them dearly for sincere reasons.

Mr. Morgan’s approach to gun regulation was more akin to King George III, peering down his nose at the unruly colonies and wondering how to bring the savages to heel. He might have wanted to recall that part of the reason the right to bear arms is codified in the Constitution is that Britain was trying to disarm the citizenry at the time.

He regrets none of it, but clearly understands his scolding of “stupid” opponents of gun laws was not everyone’s cup of tea.

“I’m in danger of being the guy down at the end of the bar who is always going on about the same thing,” he said. He added that he was sure there were plenty of people in the heartland angry “about this British guy telling them how to lead their lives and what they should do with their guns.”

In the current media age, no one is expected to be a eunuch, without values or beliefs, but Mr. Morgan’s lecturing on the evils of guns have clanked hard against the CNN brand, which, for good or ill, is built on the middle way.

We don’t look for moral leadership from CNN, or from a British host on a rampage. Guns, along with many other great and horrible things, are knit into the fabric of this country. There are folkways peculiar to America that Mr. Morgan is just learning, including the fact that if you want to stick out, you first have to work on fitting in.