There is Trouble in Googlicousappleplexyintelia

Trouble in Googlicousappleplexyintelia

There is Trouble in Googlicousappleplexyintelia

Something really important is happening in the Silicon Valley.  You deserve to know about it.  In order for you to appreciate how important this is, you must begin by realizing the backdrop of where and when this is happening.

Few people say it out loud because it is too scary to think about but…God has been almost entirely dismissed from the Silicon Valley.  You are looked at as if there is something wrong with you if you believe in a higher power.  In some circles, you are treated like a traitor to human progress because you carry a Bible.

People really try to be hip here.  So…their dismissive attitude toward Christians is displayed in subtle ways.  They will roll their eyes while they purse their lips.  You will catch it on the edge of a remark or in the almost universal assumption that following Christ will cost you massive I.Q. points.

Silicon Valley is an intellectual Tower of Babel.  Their feverish obsession to build a computerized heaven has blinded them to many realities. In their fervor to leave the church behind, they have given birth to the Church of Technology.  Their god really is a jealous god with his own giga jihad.

There are deep cracks in the walls of this citadel of electronic wizardry. All is not well in Googlicousappleplexyintelia.  Glassy-eyed worker bees peer endlessly into devices while soul sucking corporations have created the perfect prison for millennials seeking upward mobility.

To be sure, billionaires abound here…but so does poverty.  Poverty is spreading fast in the Silicon Valley.  It is a testament to the failure of Limousine Liberalism.   Scrooge, who when asked to help the poor, began rattling off the names of government programs he supported.  In the same way today’s moguls toss tips to social agencies and then look the other way.”

Among the poor, wages have not budged in years, while the cost of everything has skyrocketed.

simplicity

Into this world, a simple meeting in a simple church began on March 2, 2014.  It is still going and the crowds continue to grow.  Yes, it is a simple meeting and that in itself is part of the miracle.

Here lately, spiritual movements have sought to be exotic, mystical and very emotional.  Northern California rewards meetings that tout something new and different and more intense.  The thirst for something new drives most spiritual gatherings here.

Yes, there are miracles in these meetings.  Just like that sister that could not stand or move her legs for two years and experienced healing. Yes, pastors have come together in unity.  Yes, there is exuberant worship.  Yet, none of these things are the outstanding quality of these series of meetings.

The stunning uniqueness is its simplicity.  It is in the simplicity of God’s presence; the simplicity of the joy and peace; the effortless witness that is moving  the unchurched to seek God and be converted.

No one is pulling a muscle trying to relate to the hip culture.  No one is stage diving into bizarre behavior in an attempt to churn up a blessing. This simple meeting runs against the grain of all of that.

It matches what my friend Winkie Pratney said about revival.  He said, The things that touch men and women in an awakening are not strange and hidden things made clear but plain and simple things made central, old things made new.  The familiar touched again with heaven.  What we see in revival is the truth of things anew, The change brought about by the restoration of wonder and mystery in simplicity.  In revival, do not seek for new things from God, but seek to see God through new eyes. (Not sure if you wanted to print twice on purpose or not)

The mark of apostolic preaching and revival focus is a Church in love with Jesus Christ, her Lord.  Nothing else dominates the landscape of true awakening; nothing is seen as more important as the loveliness of God in the face of the Savior.”

Stay tuned for more about this miracle of simplicity in Silicon Valley.

These meetings will continue for a third week starting this Sunday

Silicon Valley around San Jose

Google puts a large mystery barge in San Francisco Bay.

google barge

Google takes secrecy to new heights with mystery barge

By Ronnie Cohen and Alexei Oreskovic

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – How badly does Google want to keep under wraps a mysterious project taking shape on a barge in San Francisco Bay? Badly enough to require U.S. government officials to sign confidentiality agreements.

At least one Coast Guard employee has had to sign a non-disclosure agreement with the Internet giant, said Barry Bena, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman. Another person who would only identify himself as an inspector for a California government agency had to do the same.

Moored in the shadow of the Bay Bridge off of Treasure Island, a former military base, the nondescript barge is stacked several stories high with white shipping containers, and sprouts what appear to be antennas on top. The hulking structure, half shrouded in scaffolding, has stirred intense speculation in the Bay Area since reports of its existence surfaced late last week.

Technology website CNET theorized that the vessel might be a floating data center that will house banks of computers. Local TV station KPIX said the barge is intended to serve as a floating retail store for Google’s “Glass” wearable computer device – although its external appearance, at least thus far, doesn’t suggest such a purpose.

Adding to the mystery, a second similar barge was recently spotted in Portland, Maine, and is also registered to By and Large LLC, according to local media reports.

The company itself is keeping mum, refusing even to acknowledge its affiliation with the vessels.

Secrecy is a standard business practice in Silicon Valley, where technology companies such as Apple Inc go to great lengths to keep their latest gadgets under wraps and a constellation of blogs compete to reveal highly prized details.

But the concealment effort surrounding the barge is in another league. Chain-link fences and security guards encircle a pier and a couple of nearby buildings on the island, which sits between San Francisco and Oakland.

A California state inspector, who said he had business in the hangar-like Building 3 where some of the early construction took place, told Reuters he had to surrender his mobile phone and sign a confidentiality agreement in order to enter.

Bob Jessup, a construction company superintendent who works in a building across the street, said Google spent the past year working on the project. He said they fenced off a wide area and brought in at least 40 welders a day, who worked around the clock and refused to say a word.

“They wouldn’t give up any of the information,” Jessup said. “It was a phenomenal production. None of them would tell us anything.”

He said they worked on the inside and the outside of the shipping containers, outfitting them with electronics – “very hush hush” – and then loaded them onto the barge with a crane. They put sides on the containers, with glass windows in some of them. They had to weld them very precisely so they could stack, Jessup recounted.

Jessup said he could not imagine that Google would try to use the floating vessel as a retail outlet. “Who’s going to want to climb up in there?” he asked. “It’s really ugly.”

The vessel is registered to a company called By and Large LLC, and some nearby property on Treasure Island has been subleased to the same firm. Representatives of the firm could not be reached for comment.

Larry Goldzband, the executive director of the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, told Reuters his agency has had several meetings with Google officials about the barge in recent months. Yet the company provided little information other than telling him that the vessel will be used for “general technology purposes,” he said.

Google “could not give us a specific plan of any kind,” not even whether they intended the barge to move or stay in one place, Goldzband said. If the barge remains in place for an extended period of time after its construction is completed, it will require a permit from the BCDC, he said.

“We’ve asked counsel to get us as much information as soon as they can, so that we can continue the discussion,” Goldzband said, referring to Google’s law firm.

(Reporting by Ronnie Cohen and Alexei Oreskovic; Editing by Edwin Chan, Jonathan Weber and Lisa Shumaker)

NSA disguised itself as Google to spy, say reports

NSA disguised itself as Google to spy, say reports

If a recently leaked document is any indication, the US National Security Agency — or its UK counterpart — appears to have put on a Google suit to gather intelligence.

Edward Moyer

September 12, 2013 2:19 PM PDT

The flag of the NSA.

Here’s one of the latest tidbits on the NSA surveillance scandal (which seems to be generating nearly as many blog items as there are phone numbers in the spy agency’s data banks).

Earlier this week, Techdirt picked up on a passing mention in a Brazilian news story and a Slate article to point out that the US National Security Agency had apparently impersonated Google on at least one occasion to gather data on people. (Mother Jones subsequently pointed outTechdirt’s point-out.)

Brazilian site Fantastico obtained and published a document leaked by Edward Snowden, which diagrams how a “man in the middle attack” involving Google was apparently carried out.

A technique commonly used by hackers, a MITM attack involves using a fake security certificate to pose as a legitimate Web service, bypass browser security settings, and then intercept data that an unsuspecting person is sending to that service. Hackers could, for example, pose as a banking Web site and steal passwords.

The article by Brazil’s Fantastico mentions a hitherto unknown GCHQ spy program called “Flying Pig.” This prompted a Twitter quip from Electronic Frontier Foundation attorney Kurt Opsahl: “PRISM, Flying Pig. Someone in the surveillance state has a thing for Pink Floyd album covers.”(Credit: Pig: Musiclipse.com; prism: Harvest, Capitol.)

The technique is particularly sly because the hackers then use the password to log in to the real banking site and then serve as a “man in the middle,” receiving requests from the banking customer, passing them on to the bank site, and then returning requested info to the customer — all the while collecting data for themselves, with neither the customer nor the bank realizing what’s happening. Such attacks can be used against e-mail providers too.

It’s not clear if the supposed attack in the Fantastico document was handled by the NSA or by its UK counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). The article by the Brazilian news agency says, “In this case, data is rerouted to the NSA central, and then relayed to its destination, without either end noticing.”

“There have been rumors of the NSA and others using those kinds of MITM attacks,” Mike Masnick writes on Techdirt, “but to have it confirmed that they’re doing them against the likes of Google… is a big deal — and something I would imagine does not make [Google] particularly happy.”

Google provided a short statement to Mother Jones reporter Josh Harkinson in response to his questions on the matter: “As for recent reports that the US government has found ways to circumvent our security systems, we have no evidence of any such thing ever occurring. We provide our user data to governments only in accordance with the law.” (The company is also trying to win the right toprovide more transparency regarding government requests for data on Google users.)

CNET got a “no comment” from the NSA in response to our request for more information.

As TechDirt suggests, an MITM attack on the part of the NSA or GCHQ would hardly be a complete shock. The New York Times reported last week that the NSA has sidestepped common Net encryption methods in a number of ways, including hacking into the servers of private companies to steal encryption keys, collaborating with tech companies to build in back doors, and covertly introducing weaknesses into encryption standards.

It wouldn’t be much of a stretch to obtain a fake security certificate to foil the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) cryptographic protocol that’s designed to verify the authenticity of Web sites and ensure secure Net communications.

Indeed, such attacks have been aimed at Google before, including in 2011, when a hacker broke into the systems of DigiNotar — a Dutch company that issued Web security certificates — and created more than 500 SSL certificates used to authenticate Web sites.

In any case, the purported NSA/GCHG impersonation of Google inspired a rather clever graphic by Mother Jones, one that might even impress the rather clever Doodlers at Google: