AMERICA, IT’S NOW OR NEVER

warns

 

The Holy Spirit warns,”America, It’s now or never.

By Mario Murillo

 

Sin is one thing…but sin that is designed to provoke God is quite another.  Our leaders are now shaking their fist at God.  Our decadence is now a frenzied decadence.  At home and abroad our elected officials are hard selling immorality and false Gods.  The left is using Hollywood and the media to punish the righteous.   We have taunted God to the point that we are now seeing the result in our daily life.

The Holy Spirit–through many vessels is declaring a dire warning: “America, it’s now or never!”

Bloomberg news made this chilling statement today: “No President can save the American Economy.”    Hillary Clinton said yesterday that the leaders of the world are sternly warning America who not to vote for in our presidential election.  Universities and the media are siding with rioters and looters against the police causing a spike in crime, the lowest morale among cops in our history, and—worst of all—an end to free speech.  78% of all Americans are using or abusing prescription drugs making us the most addicted Americans in history.  No living American has seen our nation in such a terrible conditionBut that fact is but the tip of the iceberg.

America has been beaten into submission.  We are now—in the eyes of the world—a client state that must fall into line.  Until now, no nation would dare to intimidate our elections.   Billionaire George Soros openly announces he will finance demonstrations and riots.   Until now, no one could do that without being prosecuted.  Our drug addled state makes us easy prey for mass manipulation and foreign invasion.  Until now, no country in a pandemic of drugs would decriminalize even more drugs.  If America was a patient, the doctor would deliver a terrifying tale of multiple terminal conditions.   The only question left: which disease will deliver the fatal blow?  Is there any hope left for America?

IT IS NOW OR NEVER FOR AMERICA: embracing the reality of that statement is our major hope.  Whatever we are going to do—we must do now.  Don’t delude yourself into thinking we have more time.   You deceive yourself at your own peril.    Those who handle warnings carelessly, will almost certainly be fatalities in the maelstrom.

In the midst of these great horrors we are still a divided church.  This is the most jaw dropping fact of all: U.S. Christians refuse to unify.   Everything is at stake—how is this possible?  What decadent arrogance allows Christian leaders to keep building empires?  Why do they steadfastly refuse to join their brothers and sisters in the struggle to save the nation?   How can they ignore the deafening air raid siren?  What will they do if the church is driven underground and their little kingdoms are gone in an instant?

GOD SEEKS A CORE.  What has happened to America and the church is dreadful.   But just as dreadful as these things are that is how wonderful it is to know that all God needs is a core.   1 Samuel 14: 6 says, “Then Jonathan said to the young man who bore his armor, “Come, let us go over to the garrison of these uncircumcised; it may be that the Lord will work for us. For nothing restrains the Lord from saving by many or by few.”

Martin Luther said, “One with God is a majority.”  Gideon proved this.  When all of Israel was dulled by immorality, and failed to rally to the cause, God honed 300 men to save the nation.  God seeks a core that will not hold back in prayer, action and sacrifice.  He seeks you.

You and I can’t wait for the church to wake up.  No pastor should stall revival in committee.  No soldier of Jesus should look for the right amount of support or a consensus.  There is nothing—and no one to wait for.

The Bible and Church history have taught one undeniable fact:  One person full of fire will ignite a generation to watch them burn.   Satan has made a mistake and we must make him pay for that mistake.   Satan plunged America so quickly and forcefully into dark perversion that he has nauseated them with wickedness.

The anger you see in the election is not political…it is rooted in their spirits.  They are sick to death of the lies of our culture.  They feel outrage at the betrayal of our leaders.  If we seize this moment—if we go full bore—if we abandon ourselves to outreach—we will see the greatest harvest in 40 years.

However, this door will close and this priceless moment will pass into the night where no man can work.  Since it is now or never…whatever we are going to do for Christ in America must be done now.  I place before you—my beloved partner—a do or die situation and I am praying with all of my heart that you will heed the urgent call of God in what I know will be our finest hour.

Trump and Cruz send shivers down GOP spines

Trump Ted

Trump and Cruz send shivers down GOP spines

The prospect of either man as the Republican nominee is setting off alarm bells among officials and operatives across the country.
By ALEX ISENSTADT 01/05/16 05:11 AM EST

With only weeks before GOP primary voters first cast their ballots, the level of alarm among establishment Republicans about the enduring dominance of Donald Trump and Ted Cruz is reaching new heights.

In private conversations with several former aides, Mitt Romney, who in March will keynote the National Republican Congressional Committee’s annual fundraising dinner, has expressed rising frustration about Trump’s prolonged lead in polls and has argued that the real-estate mogul could inflict lasting damage on the party’s brand.

In Washington and elsewhere, meanwhile, Republicans are on the hunt for a political entity that can be used to stop Trump. In recent weeks, Alex Castellanos, a veteran TV ad man who was a top adviser to George W. Bush and Romney, has been meeting with top GOP operatives and donors to gauge interest in launching an anti-Trump vehicle that would pummel the Manhattan businessman on the television airwaves.
Those who’ve met with Castellanos say he’s offered detailed presentations on how such an offensive would play out. Castellanos has said that an anti-Trump ad campaign, which would be designed to cast him as a flawed strongman, would cost well into the millions. It was unclear, the sources said, whether Castellanos, who did not respond to a request for comment, would ultimately go through with the effort.

One growing worry about Trump or Cruz, top party officials, donors, and operatives across the country say, is that nominating either man would imperil lawmakers in down-ballot races, especially those residing in moderate states and districts.

“At some point, we have to deal with the fact that there are at least two candidates who could utterly destroy the Republican bench for a generation if they became the nominee,” said Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. “We’d be hard-pressed to elect a Republican dogcatcher north of the Mason-Dixon or west of the Mississippi.”

“Trump and Cruz are worrisome to most Republican candidates for governor, senator and Congress,” said Curt Anderson, a longtime GOP strategist and former Republican National Committee political director. “Some will say they are not worried, but they are.”

Romney has been calling around to former advisers to sound them out about the race, and to kvetch about Trump’s surprising durability. But in the immediate term, at least, he has expressed unwillingness to lend his hand to a stop-Trump effort — or to endorse a candidate more palatable to a GOP establishment paralyzed by his rise and worried that nominating him or Cruz would scupper an opportunity to control both the White House and Congress in 2017.

The concern is particularly acute in the Senate, where Republicans are fighting to preserve a relatively slim four-seat majority, defending more than half a dozen seats in hard-to-win swing states. Among them: Ohio, a presidential battleground state where Republican Sen. Rob Portman faces a perilous path to reelection.

When Trump traveled to the state in November, he met with Matt Borges, Ohio’s Republican Party chairman — who warned the front-runner that “divisive rhetoric won’t help us carry Ohio.”

“It’s time for people who have never won squat here to listen to the people who have been doing it for decades,” Borges said in an interview. “I’m just looking out for how we win in November.”

In Wisconsin, some party officials fret that a Trump or Cruz nomination could sink Republican Sen. Ron Johnson, who faces a tough race against his predecessor, Russ Feingold.
“Certainly, it would be bad for Ron Johnson if Trump is the nominee,” said Wisconsin Rep. Reid Ribble who, like Johnson, was swept into Congress in the Republican wave of 2010. “I think Trump is probably really bad down-ballot.”

Some top party strategists have spent months considering how the outcome of the primary will impact congressional races. Since last spring, the National Republican Senatorial Committee has been poring over research and polling data in hopes of better understanding how each of the Republican candidates running for president would affect GOP hopefuls running for Senate. The committee has held internal meetings to discuss the pros and cons of each presidential contender and how they would affect each key Senate race.

The House, where Republicans have a historic 30-seat majority, is more secure for the party. But there, too, the GOP has reason to worry: The party must defend nearly three dozen endangered seats — many of them in liberal-to-moderate states like California, New York and Florida.

Should Trump or Cruz win the nomination, party operatives say, some longtime officeholders in more conservative districts such as New Jersey Rep. Scott Garrett or Florida Rep. John Mica, who typically skate to general election wins, could find themselves in tougher-than-usual contests.

Cruz’s campaign pushes back on the idea that the Texas senator would imperil those running in House and Senate races. A Cruz nomination, they argue, would motivate conservatives to turn out to vote in a way that an establishment candidate couldn’t.

“Down-ballot Republicans need Ted Cruz at the top of the ticket because he is the only candidate in the race who can excite the base to show up in November,” said Rick Tyler, a Cruz spokesman. “If we chose another moderate, we will simply lose seats we would otherwise win.”

Trump’s campaign didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Some, though, are already counseling Republican candidates to begin to think about how to distance themselves from a Trump or Cruz in the event either wins the nomination.

“Candidates will need to develop their own brand,” said Pennsylvania Rep. Charlie Dent, a Republican who has represented a swing district in Lehigh Valley since 2004. “A candidate will need to run his or her own campaign and distance themselves from the top of the ticket.”

Among the tricky questions candidates will be forced to consider: whether it’s worth endorsing either potential nominee.

Illinois Rep. Bob Dold, a Republican who represents a liberal-leaning, suburban Chicago district, said he had ruled out endorsing Trump. He declined to say whether he’d back Cruz.

While Dold said he was monitoring the primary, he argued that voters would be willing to look beyond the party’s presidential nominee when determining his fate in November.

“Illinois 10th District,” he said, “has a long history of ticket splitting.”

 

KRAUTHAMMER: RUBIO IS MOST LIKELY TO WIN GOP NOMINATION

 Marco Rubio

KRAUTHAMMER: RUBIO IS MOST LIKELY TO WIN GOP NOMINATION

 Columnist Charles Krauthammer named Florida Senator Marco Rubio his pick as most likely to be the GOP nominee on Friday’s “Special Report” on the Fox News Channel.

Krauthammer was asked by fellow panelist Steve Hayes how he would allocate his money if he was given $100 to go Las Vegas and bet on who will be the nominee. Krauthammer put the most money, $40 on Rubio, with $30 going to Jeb Bush, $15 to Scott Walker, and the remaining $15 on booze. He added “he’s [Rubio] my underestimated dark horse candidate who threads his way, young, energetic. He’s got a program and I think if he runs against Hillary, the contrast say the vigor, the energy that Kennedy-esque idea will be be a major one.”

Amy Walter, National Editor of the Cook Political Report put the most money on Walker, giving him $40, with $25 going to Bush, and the remaining $35 split evenly among the entire field.

Hayes gave Walker and Rubio $30 each, $15 to Jeb Bush, and $10 to Ted Cruz, with the remaining $15 going to the field as a whole.

Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett

House Defunds Obamacare, Keeps Govt Open. Only Obama wants to shut down the government.

House Defunds Obamacare, Keeps Govt Open

Image: House Defunds Obamacare, Keeps Govt Open

Speaker of the House John Boehner is cheered on Sept. 20 after the House of Representatives passed a bill that would prevent a government shutdown while crippling Obamacare.

Friday, 20 Sep 2013 11:27 AM

The U.S. House voted to finance the federal government through mid-December and choke off funding for President Barack Obama’s healthcare law, setting up a showdown with the Senate and the White House.

The Republican-controlled House today passed, 230-189, a stopgap measure to fund government operations after current authority expires Sept. 30. The bill preserves across-the-board spending cuts at an annual rate of $986.3 billion and permanently defunds the Affordable Care Act.

“The fight to delay Obamacare doesn’t end next week. It keeps going on until we get it,” Representative Paul Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican and his party’s 2012 vice presidential nominee, told reporters today in Washington.

 

The spending measure now will be sent to the Senate where it will pass without defunding the healthcare law, Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada said yesterday. Obama administration officials said the president would veto the House bill if sent to him by Congress.

If the Obama administration and lawmakers can’t agree on the stopgap funding, most, though not all, operations would come to a halt in less than two weeks. Republicans are using the stopgap spending bill as a vehicle to try to choke off funds for the health program the party has opposed since 2009.

Sen. Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican and chief Senate opponent of the health law, said he’s willing to do “everything necessary and anything possible,” including holding a filibuster, to block action on the spending measure as a way to end funding for the health-care law.

The Senate is expected to start considering the legislation on Sept. 23 with goal of finishing by Sept. 26.

Procedural Tactic

Democratic leaders are considering a procedural tactic that would put Cruz and his allies in an awkward spot and upend their efforts.

Under Senate rules, they could have a simple majority vote that would strip the health-care defunding language once they end debate on the House measure.

House Republicans haven’t decided how to proceed once the Senate passes the measure after stripping out the health language.

If Boehner allows the Senate bill to proceed, he would need enough Democratic votes join Republicans to pass it and avoid a government shutdown.

House Republican leaders also could decide to continue revising the measure and send the amended version back to the Senate for a vote, complicating the process and raising the risk of a shutdown as time runs out.

Debt Ceiling

The House spending measure also includes a provision directing the Treasury on how to prioritize payments if the debt ceiling is breached.

House Republicans said today they’d start working next week on legislation to raise the nation’s debt limit and attach a one-year delay in the health law, cuts to entitlement programs and approval for the Keystone XL pipeline.

“The next 10 days are very important for our country,” said Representative Tim Graves, a Georgia Republican, who has pushed for defunding the health-care law.

Ryan of Wisconsin said the measures Republicans will attach would reduce the U.S. budget deficit in the long term.

Related article:

Rubio: Only Obama Wants to Shut Down Government

Rubio

Wednesday, 18 Sep 2013 01:51 PM

By Jim Meyers and John Bachman

Republicans should do “anything and everything” to prevent the “disaster” of Obamacare, Sen. Marco Rubio tells Newsmax. But he insists it can be done without shutting down the government.

The Florida Republican asserts that President Barack Obama actually wants a government shutdown to achieve a “political win,” and the administration is going to fight to the bitter end to defend its healthcare reforms.

Elected in 2010, Rubio is considered a rising star in the Republican Party. He delivered the GOP’s response to Obama’s State of the Union address in February and has been mentioned as a presidential candidate in 2016.

 

His committee assignments include the Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.

In an exclusive interview Wednesday with Newsmax TV, Rubio discusses efforts to stop Obamacare and the possibility of a government shutdown.

“Every single member of the Republican conference agrees that Obamacare should be stopped, but the disagreement is about the tactic,” he says. “I’m not in favor of shutting down the government. The president appears now politically to be in favor of shutting down the government.

“I’m in favor of funding the government at the levels that were agreed to last year in the Budget Control Act and not spending a single penny more of hardworking taxpayer dollars on a disaster, which is Obamacare.

“Actually, the administration has admitted it’s a disaster because they’ve had to delay major portions of it. Labor unions that strongly supported Obamacare are now asking to be exempted from it.

“So we should be doing anything and everything we can to prevent this law from going into effect, because once it starts to hurt people, it’s going to hurt our economy in ways that are very difficult to undo later.”

The House will pass a plan to delay and defund Obamacare but to keep the government  open, Speaker John Boehner says.

“That’s very positive news,” says Rubio. “It’s now going to call attention to the fact that we can keep the government open, we can fund the government, but we don’t have to shut down the government, and we don’t have to fund Obamacare.

“It’s the president who’s threatening to shut down the government because he is saying, and it’s the position his allies in the Senate so far have taken, that unless they fund Obamacare, they won’t fund the government.

“The president’s basically looking for a political win, and I guess his political people have told him that this is a political win: shut down the government and blame the Republicans. The problem is that’s not the Republican position.”

obama_angry_2012_8_6

Rubio predicted that the House will pass a short-term budget to keep the government running.

“If in fact the government shuts down, it will be unfortunately because the president and his allies believe that Obamacare is so important to them that they are willing to shut down the government over it.

“That’s shortsighted, primarily because they are going to fight to the end to defend a disaster, something that even their own allies and labor unions are asking to be let out from.”