Judge Not: The one big lie that is destroying America

What is the most dangerous lie in America?  What is killing us?  The abuse of a simple phrase that Jesus used, “Judge not that you be not judged.”  In the last few days, our site has smeared with vile posts by people claiming to be open-minded and, amazingly claiming to be more intelligent.

Judge Not: The one big lie that is destroying America

By Mario Murillo

What is the most dangerous lie in America?  What is killing us?  The abuse of a simple phrase that Jesus used, “Judge not that you be not judged.”  In the last few days, our site has smeared with vile posts by people claiming to be open-minded and, amazingly claiming to be more intelligent.  What was even more tragic was the host of self-defined Christians who went along with them saying silly things, “we shouldn’t judge,” and my personal favorite, “you are making it harder for us to reach people.”

I am not making it harder for you to reach people, because I wonder if you are reaching anyone.  How can you witness?  At some  point in witnessing you have to make a moral judgment.

I live in Northern California, ground zero for liberalism.  They are constantly telling people not to judge.  Their hilarious hypocrisy is breathtaking.  Bay Area liberals are the most judgmental people on the planet.  I have lived under environmental, nutritional, gender sharia law most of my adult life.

Last December in Danville California I said, “Merry Christmas,” to my waiter.  He scowled at me and said, “I do not want to exclude anyone.”  Talk about a hair trigger!  Everything on earth is a cause for liberals.  How do they sleep at night with so much judging to do???  They judge, food, animal treatment, gardening, the car you drive, even your fireplace.  To them, it is a world is filled with “ists.”    Sexists, elitists, capitalists, fascists, racists, and now because of animal rights there are “Specists” (people who believe humans are a higher species than man.)

Christians we better wake up!  Don’t take Jesus out of context just so you can hide in a deeply immoral nation.   Now read the best article ever on the abuse of “Judge not.”  By By  BRANNON HOWSE

Tolerance mongers seem to have found the one absolute truth they are willing to live by. How many times have you heard someone say, “Judge not lest you be judged”? The statement has become the great American open-mindedness mantra when anyone has the courage to declare that someone else’s belief, actions or lifestyle is morally amiss.

Another form of the same non-judgmental judgment is “that may be true for you, but it’s not true for me.” The logic behind the statement goes something like this: “Your truth is your truth and my truth is my truth. We are both right, and I hold to my opinion of truth.” The last time I checked, it was impossible for two chairs to occupy the same space around my dining room table, but evidently such rules of time, space and logic don’t apply to tolerance philosophy.

Postmodernism’s live-and-let-live concept of truth argues that even two opposite and wholly contradictory claims can both be true. This is as stupid as saying that black and white are the same color. Yet, it clarifies the absurdity of the postmodernism we are all supposed to blithely accept as the fundamental principle by which we respond to each other’s ideas – the “please and thank-you” of philosophical respect.

So beware.  If you dare claim that another person’s truth is not, in fact, truth but is, in fact, wrong, you are not only being intolerant but you are also being – Mantra forbid! – Judgmental.

In his book “True for You, But Not for Me,” Paul Copan describes the fallacy in this all too common thinking:

It has been said that the most frequently quoted Bible verse is no longer John 3:16 but Matthew 7:1: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged.” We cannot glibly quote this, though, without understanding what Jesus meant. When Jesus condemned judging, he wasn’t at all implying we should never make judgments about anyone. After all, a few verses later, Jesus himself calls certain people “pigs” and “dogs” (Matt 7:6) and “wolves in sheep’s clothing” (7:15). … What Jesus condemns is a critical and judgmental spirit, an unholy sense of superiority. Jesus commanded us to examine ourselves first for the problems we so easily see in others. Only then can we help remove the speck in another’s eye – which, incidentally, assumes that a problem exists and must be confronted.

Those that tell you not to judge, quoting Matthew 7:1 grossly out of context, are often some of the most mean-spirited, judgmental souls you could ever meet. It’s not, of course, that they don’t want anyone to judge anything, because they want very much to judge and condemn your commitment to lovingly speak and practice your Christian worldview. You see how these tolerance rules work? We must tolerate them, but they don’t have to tolerate us. The logic is consistent, anyway.

Today’s postmodern culture of adults and students is so consumed by non-judgmentalism that there are some who say we should not even call wrong or evil the terrorists that attacked America on Sept. 11, 2001. In a Time magazine essay entitled “God Is Not on My Side. Or Yours,” Roger Rosenblatt offers the philosophical underpinnings of the live-and-let-live rule for global terrorism:

“One would like to think that God is on our side against the terrorists, because the terrorists are wrong and we are in the right, and any deity worth his salt would be able to discern that objective truth. But this is simply good-hearted arrogance cloaked in morality – the same kind of thinking that makes people decide that God created humans in his own image. The God worth worshiping is the one who pays us the compliment of self-regulation, and we might return it by minding our own business.”

ht and wrong is “good-hearted,” even if the reactions to it aren’t. Alison Hornstein, for instance, is a student at Yale University who observed the disconnect between tolerance and reality. Writing on “The Question That We Should Be Asking – Is Terrorism Wrong?” in the Dec. 17, 2001, issue of Newsweek, Alison noted, “My generation may be culturally sensitive, but we hesitate to make moral judgments.” While that might be putting it mildly, she goes on to say:

Student reactions expressed in the daily newspaper and in class pointed to the differences between our life circumstances and those of the [9-11] perpetrators, suggesting that these differences had caused the previous day’s events. Noticeably absent was a general outcry of indignation at what had been the most successful terrorist attack of our lifetime. These reactions and similar ones on other campuses have made it apparent that my generation is uncomfortable assessing, or even asking whether a moral wrong has taken place.”

Hornstein further describes how on Sept. 12th – one day after Islamic extremists murdered more than 3,000 people on American soil – one of her professors “did not see much difference between Hamas suicide bombers and American soldiers who died fighting in World War II. When I saw one or two students nodding in agreement, I raised my hand. …. American soldiers, in uniform, did not have a policy of specifically targeting civilians; suicide bombers, who wear plainclothes, do. The professor didn’t call on me. The people who did get a chance to speak cited various provocations for terrorism; not one of them questioned its morality.”

If Americans don’t start to judge and punish evil instead of accepting all ideas and beliefs as equal, we will become a nation that welcomes same-sex marriage, polygamy, pedophilia, incest, euthanasia and likely a host of moral aberrations so bizarre they’re still hidden in the darkest reaches of the Internet.

I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, “you know we are not to judge people; even the Bible says ‘judge not lest you be judged.’” Americans had better start getting comfortable with politically incorrect, non-humanistic forms of making intelligent judgments on moral issues because even if we don’t make them, I’m concerned there is Someone very willing to hold our nation accountable for what we allow. And He doesn’t respond well to intimidation, name-calling, flawed logic or being quoted out of context.

The one phrase that is destroying America

What is the most dangerous lie in America?  What is killing us?  The abuse of a simple phrase that Jesus used, “Judge not that you be not judged.”  In the last few days, our site has smeared with vile posts by people claiming to be open-minded and, amazingly claiming to be more intelligent.  What was even more tragic was the host of self-defined Christians who went along with them saying silly things, “we shouldn’t judge,” and my personal favorite, “you are making it harder for us to reach people.”

I am not making it harder for you to reach people, because I wonder if you are reaching anyone.  How can you witness?  At some  point in witnessing you have to make a moral judgment.

I live in Northern California, ground zero for liberalism.  They are constantly telling people not to judge.  Their hilarious hypocrisy is breathtaking.  Bay Area liberals are the most judgmental people on the planet.  I have lived under environmental, nutritional, gender sharia law most of my adult life.

Last December in Danville California I said, “Merry Christmas,” to my waiter.  He scowled at me and said, “I do not want to exclude anyone.”  Talk about a hair trigger!  Everything on earth is a cause for liberals.  How do they sleep at night with so much judging to do???  They judge, food, animal treatment, gardening, the car you drive, even your fireplace.  To them, it is a world is filled with “ists.”    Sexists, elitists, capitalists, fascists, racists, and now because of animal rights there are “Specists” (people who believe humans are a higher species than man.)

Christians we better wake up!  Don’t take Jesus out of context just so you can hide in a deeply immoral nation.   Now read the best article ever on the abuse of “Judge not.”  By By  BRANNON HOWSE

Tolerance mongers seem to have found the one absolute truth they are willing to live by. How many times have you heard someone say, “Judge not lest you be judged”? The statement has become the great American open-mindedness mantra when anyone has the courage to declare that someone else’s belief, actions or lifestyle is morally amiss.

Another form of the same non-judgmental judgment is “that may be true for you, but it’s not true for me.” The logic behind the statement goes something like this: “Your truth is your truth and my truth is my truth. We are both right, and I hold to my opinion of truth.” The last time I checked, it was impossible for two chairs to occupy the same space around my dining room table, but evidently such rules of time, space and logic don’t apply to tolerance philosophy.

Postmodernism’s live-and-let-live concept of truth argues that even two opposite and wholly contradictory claims can both be true. This is as stupid as saying that black and white are the same color. Yet, it clarifies the absurdity of the postmodernism we are all supposed to blithely accept as the fundamental principle by which we respond to each other’s ideas – the “please and thank-you” of philosophical respect.

So beware.  If you dare claim that another person’s truth is not, in fact, truth but is, in fact, wrong, you are not only being intolerant but you are also being – Mantra forbid! – Judgmental.

In his book “True for You, But Not for Me,” Paul Copan describes the fallacy in this all too common thinking:

It has been said that the most frequently quoted Bible verse is no longer John 3:16 but Matthew 7:1: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged.” We cannot glibly quote this, though, without understanding what Jesus meant. When Jesus condemned judging, he wasn’t at all implying we should never make judgments about anyone. After all, a few verses later, Jesus himself calls certain people “pigs” and “dogs” (Matt 7:6) and “wolves in sheep’s clothing” (7:15). … What Jesus condemns is a critical and judgmental spirit, an unholy sense of superiority. Jesus commanded us to examine ourselves first for the problems we so easily see in others. Only then can we help remove the speck in another’s eye – which, incidentally, assumes that a problem exists and must be confronted.

Those that tell you not to judge, quoting Matthew 7:1 grossly out of context, are often some of the most mean-spirited, judgmental souls you could ever meet. It’s not, of course, that they don’t want anyone to judge anything, because they want very much to judge and condemn your commitment to lovingly speak and practice your Christian worldview. You see how these tolerance rules work? We must tolerate them, but they don’t have to tolerate us. The logic is consistent, anyway.

Today’s postmodern culture of adults and students is so consumed by non-judgmentalism that there are some who say we should not even call wrong or evil the terrorists that attacked America on Sept. 11, 2001. In a Time magazine essay entitled “God Is Not on My Side. Or Yours,” Roger Rosenblatt offers the philosophical underpinnings of the live-and-let-live rule for global terrorism:

“One would like to think that God is on our side against the terrorists, because the terrorists are wrong and we are in the right, and any deity worth his salt would be able to discern that objective truth. But this is simply good-hearted arrogance cloaked in morality – the same kind of thinking that makes people decide that God created humans in his own image. The God worth worshiping is the one who pays us the compliment of self-regulation, and we might return it by minding our own business.”

ht and wrong is “good-hearted,” even if the reactions to it aren’t. Alison Hornstein, for instance, is a student at Yale University who observed the disconnect between tolerance and reality. Writing on “The Question That We Should Be Asking – Is Terrorism Wrong?” in the Dec. 17, 2001, issue of Newsweek, Alison noted, “My generation may be culturally sensitive, but we hesitate to make moral judgments.” While that might be putting it mildly, she goes on to say:

Student reactions expressed in the daily newspaper and in class pointed to the differences between our life circumstances and those of the [9-11] perpetrators, suggesting that these differences had caused the previous day’s events. Noticeably absent was a general outcry of indignation at what had been the most successful terrorist attack of our lifetime. These reactions and similar ones on other campuses have made it apparent that my generation is uncomfortable assessing, or even asking whether a moral wrong has taken place.”

Hornstein further describes how on Sept. 12th – one day after Islamic extremists murdered more than 3,000 people on American soil – one of her professors “did not see much difference between Hamas suicide bombers and American soldiers who died fighting in World War II. When I saw one or two students nodding in agreement, I raised my hand. …. American soldiers, in uniform, did not have a policy of specifically targeting civilians; suicide bombers, who wear plainclothes, do. The professor didn’t call on me. The people who did get a chance to speak cited various provocations for terrorism; not one of them questioned its morality.”

If Americans don’t start to judge and punish evil instead of accepting all ideas and beliefs as equal, we will become a nation that welcomes same-sex marriage, polygamy, pedophilia, incest, euthanasia and likely a host of moral aberrations so bizarre they’re still hidden in the darkest reaches of the Internet.

I wish I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say, “you know we are not to judge people; even the Bible says ‘judge not lest you be judged.’” Americans had better start getting comfortable with politically incorrect, non-humanistic forms of making intelligent judgments on moral issues because even if we don’t make them, I’m concerned there is Someone very willing to hold our nation accountable for what we allow. And He doesn’t respond well to intimidation, name-calling, flawed logic or being quoted out of context.

My Amazing Friend Winkie Pratney

After more than three million miles of global travel and sometimes speaking to more than half-a-million annually, Winkie has wide experience in motivating leaders, ministers, educators and young people. Winkie is a mavin, a researcher and public communicator with ability to take existing ideas, break them down to simpler forms and make them practical and freely available to others.

His technical background in organic research chemistry and lifelong involvement with musicians and in the arts, has helped him analyze the bottom line of many key areas as diverse as popular youth culture, music, movies, classic and modern revival history and emerging communication and information technology.

Leadership training for youth workers in Europe, North America and the Pacific made him an advisor and consultant to church, civic, educational, government and social welfare leaders on the needs and problems of modern teenagers. A featured speaker and guest on both radio and television talk shows in New Zealand, England, Canada and the United States, his wealth of knowledge combined with a keen sense of humor has made him a favorite among adults and youth alike.

Winkie has authored fifteen+ published books; manuals like the best-selling Youth Aflame!, the contemporary devotional apologetic The Nature And Character Of God (used in Bible schools around the world), books on contemporary and historical issues like Devil Take The Youngest – The War on Childhood, Healing the Land – A Supernatural View of Ecology, Revival – Principles to Change the World, and many other published works.

He helped helm the ground-breaking international Revival Study Bible, with over a hundred contributors from many streams of the church, the first to contain stories, segments and studies from 2,000 years of revival, evangelism and missions history gleaned from multiple nations, callings and visitations.

His audio and video lectures carried by many effective Christian youth ministries helped train hundreds of thousands around the globe. His participation with five key leaders in the series that came to be known as, Conversations with Fathers of the Faith, demonstrates his willingness to work with many different “streams” of the Church, and broad-range of ministry associates.

Winkie’s work has been used in Asia, Australasia, Europe, and North America with some key materials translated into other languages such as Filipino, Korean, Spanish and Russian. He and hisson Williams’ innovative youth training work, The Daniel Files, along with many other resources, are available on-line in digital format.

Having spoken in annual leadership training seminars for over four decades, and to young people for at least five, Winkie has worked with many leading international youth movements including, Champions For Christ, Chi Alpha, Operation Mobilization, Masters Commission, Teen Challenge, Teen Mania, Youth With A Mission, Youth For Christ, Young Life and Youth Alive. A featured speaker at major conferences, conventions, festivals and other gatherings, his “scholarship on fire” approach has impacted multitudes around the globe, and resulted in the creation or formation of new works to effectively reach, encourage and train young people.

He, his wife Faeona, and son William are New Zealanders (his son is a US born dual-citizen), and maintain a permanent residence in Auckland, NZ and low organizational profile.

Winkie is sometimes known to reply to mail, (especially from teenagers) but his frequent travels discourage lengthy correspondence and he leaves personal counseling to pastors and churches.

We are just hours away from a historic gathering at the Dream House with Winkie.  We meet at 7:15PM  1015 Estudillo Street Martinez CA 94553  Call us at 925 300 3007