U.S. CHRISTIANITY IS NOT SHRINKING

Is Christianity dying in America? Is the American church going the way of the hula hoop and the lava lamp? Is it just a matter of time until our faith dies out in America? Leftists love to say this, but it turns out it is a total lie.
Glenn T. Stanton wrote in an article entitled New Harvard Research Says U.S. Christianity Is Not Shrinking, But Growing Stronger:
“New research published late last year by scholars at Harvard University and Indiana University Bloomington is just the latest to reveal the myth. This research questioned the “secularization thesis,” which holds that the United States is following most advanced industrial nations in the death of their once vibrant faith culture. Churches becoming mere landmarks, dance halls, boutique hotels, museums, and all that.
“Not only did their examination find no support for this secularization in terms of actual practice and belief, the researchers proclaim that religion continues to enjoy “persistent and exceptional intensity” in America. These researchers hold our nation “remains an exceptional outlier and potential counter example to the secularization thesis.””
It seemed too good to be true, but then I started getting the calls—calls from leaders who openly opposed the positions I have been declaring in these blogs. They were offended by my insistence on radical soul winning. I also believe we are seeing the national trend acted out in our tent. The surge in attendance in our tent despite the dangerous location is a sign.

Leaders have begun to tell me how they are seeking God and repenting. They have changed their sermons. What is really stunning is that the power of God is flowing in their services, and the crowds which were there for entertainment are now clamoring for more Bible. Prayer meetings are starting to outdraw church socials.
Where we feel it the most is in our tent crusades. Churches who were in deep division are now joining together. They are dropping their differences in order to win the lost.
I can only report to you what is happening in my corner of the world. I was afraid this was just a passing fancy, but it appears that this change is truly taking hold!
You, our faithful readers, have a real hand in this miracle. I freely admit that I have been stern, but apparently what I have been writing is taking hold in the hearts of leaders. The good news is that hearts are turning back toward God, and it appears to be expanding.
If you think that means I will let up in my intensity in speaking the Word of the Lord—think again. We still have widespread corruption, error, and counterfeits at work in the church.  Let us at least rejoice that leaders are beginning to listen to prophets, teachers, and in some cases, even to me.  All glory to God!

THERE’S STILL TIME TO COME JOIN PERRY STONE AND ME IN RENO. IT’S FREE BUT YOU MUST REGISTER  CLICK BELOW.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/living-proof-world-convention-reno-tickets-55681078605

 

 

CHRISTIANS ARE MUCH HAPPIER THAN OTHERS, NEW STUDY SHOWS

RELIGIOUS PEOPLE MUCH HAPPIER THAN OTHERS, NEW STUDY SHOWS

buffalo-mass-mob-ap

A strong correlation exists between religiosity and personal happiness, according to a new study by the Austin Institute for the Study of Family and Culture.

The study found that people who attend religious services on a weekly basis are nearly twice as likely to describe themselves as “very happy” (45%) than people who never attend (28%). Conversely, those who never worship are twice as likely to say they are “very unhappy” (4%) as those who attend services weekly (2%).

Building on prior research, this broad survey of American adults comprised a representative sample of 15,738 Americans between the ages of 18 and 60.

The study indicated that not only religious service attendance, but self-reported “religiosity” and religious “affiliation” are also linked with happiness levels. Yet of the three indicators, service attendance has the highest correlation to increased happiness. The study showed that higher levels of church attendance “predict higher life satisfaction,” even after accounting for how important religious faith is in people’s lives.

The correlation between religiosity and happiness is clear, but explanations of the connection and possible causal relationship are less clear. One theory suggests that the social support that religious communities can provide may be a key factor contributing to increased happiness, since “religious Americans are more apt to be involved in their communities.” Yet even here, the study found “that those who attend religious services often are happier than their peers with similar levels of involvement in the community.”

These statistics tying happiness to religiosity have held true over time. A similar survey conducted ten years ago generated similar results, leading to the same conclusions. When the General Social Survey asked a sample of Americans in 2004, “Would you say that you are very happy, pretty happy, or not too happy?” religious people were more than twice as likely as the non-religious to say they were “very happy” (43%-21%). The secular people, or those who never attend worship services, were overwhelmingly more likely to say they were not too happy (21%-8%).

One could almost predict that many of those celebrating Christmas will be merry, those observing Hanukkah will be happy, but those only recognizing the “holidays” will have a little less cause for rejoicing.

Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter @tdwilliamsrome.

What happens to your brain wihen you pray