Ben Carson Cancels Hopkins Graduation Speech. The Left shows its utter intolerance.

dr-ben-

Ben Carson Cancels Hopkins Graduation Speech

Thursday, 11 Apr 2013 09:02 AM

By Melanie Batley

Conservative favorite Benjamin Carson has canceled his scheduled appearance as a graduation speaker at Johns Hopkins University medical school after an uproar over his recent comments on gay marriage.
Carson, the director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, had apologized for his comments last month on Fox News’ Sean Hannity program, during which he compared homosexuality to bestiality and pedophilia.But The New York Times reported Thursday that Paul Rothman, dean of the Johns Hopkins medical faculty, had criticized Carson for the comments amid outcries by students. The criticism, the Times reported, led Carson to send an email Wednesday to Rothman withdrawing his name as speaker at the upcoming ceremonies on the Baltimore campus.”My presence is likely to distract from the true celebratory nature of the day,” Carson reportedly told Rothman.

According to the Times, Carson also suggested in the email that he was a victim of political correctness.“Someday in the future, it is my hope and prayer that the emphasis on political correctness will decrease and we will start emphasizing rational discussion of differences so we can actually resolve problems and chart a course that is inclusive of everyone,” he wrote.The doctor had become a favorite among conservatives and Republicans after he made a speech at February’s annual prayer breakfast criticizing President Barack Obama’s healthcare plan and his call for higher taxes on the wealthy — all while the president sat two seats away on the dais.After his appearance on Hannity, students in the Hopkins graduating class reportedly petitioned the school to have him removed as a speaker. Carson, who has been associated with Hopkins for 36 years, responded to the protest with an apology for any embarrassment he may have caused the school.“What really saddens me is that my poorly chosen words caused pain for some members of our community and for that I offer a most sincere and heartfelt apology,” he said at the time. “Hurting others is diametrically opposed to who I am and what I believe.”

Mario’s Note: Face it.    A conservative black man cannot make a single verbal mistake.   If they do the onslaught from the left is intolerant and unending. 

Liberal voices on the other hand can say the most obscene and insane things, utter a tepid apology and the liberal spin machine sanitizes it immediately.  All of the liberal pundits who called for Bush to be murdered are back at their posts.  All of the news hosts who called Sarah Palin a C_ _ _ are back behind microphones.  Joe Biden can gargle with gun powder, shoot his mouth off and the press will wipe off the power burns. 

Then there are the misbehaving liberal politicians:  Anthony D. Weiner is the poster child for what I am talking about.  He did things that should banish him from the scene forever yet the rehab machine is already at work to make him Mayor of New York.    How can we forget Mayor Marion Barry from Washington D.C. caught with prostitutes and cocaine on film and reelected anyway.  What does a liberal politician have to do to be permanently exiled?  I do not think that we know.

But a conservative black man can be exiled for a single miscue.  Our most brilliant surgeon, a paragon of integrity and an inspiration to all minorities who misspoke and then apologized will have liberals calling for his head from now on.   They will never let up on him because he is a threat to their agenda.  

 If you are a liberal with even a single-cell conscience you should outraged.  You are a hopeless fool if you think that this has anything to do with journalism, facts or even sanity.  Today liberals have zero credibility.  And hold steady, in my next blog I will show you the most disgusting abuse yet by the liberal press.

 

Gifted Hands By Thomas Sowell

Gifted Hands

By Thomas Sowell – March 19, 2013

A remarkable book titled “Gifted Hands” tells the personal story of Benjamin Carson, a black kid from the Detroit ghetto who went on to become a renowned neurosurgeon.

At one time young Ben Carson had the lowest grades in his middle school class, and was the butt of teasing by his white classmates. Worse yet, he himself believed that he was just not smart enough to do the work.

As young Ben’s school work began to catch up with that of his classmates, and then began to surpass that of his classmates, his whole view of himself and of the wider world around him began to change. He began to think that he wanted to become a doctor.

There were a lot of obstacles to overcome along the way, including the fact that his mother had to be away from time to time for psychiatric treatment, as she tried to cope with the heavy pressures of trying to raise two boys whose father had deserted the family that she now had to support on a maid’s wages.

In many ways the obstacles facing young Ben Carson were like those faced by so many other youngsters in the ghetto. What was different was that he overcame those obstacles with the help of a truly heroic mother and the values she instilled in him.

It is an inspiring personal story, told plainly and unpretentiously, including the continuing challenges he faced later as a neurosurgeon operating on the brains of people with life-threatening medical problems, often with the odds against them.

To me it was a personal story in another sense, that some of his experiences as a youngster brought back experiences that I went through growing up in Harlem many years earlier.

I could understand all too well what it was like to be the lowest performing child in a class. That was my situation in the fourth grade, after my family had moved up from the South, where I had been one of the best students in the third grade — but in a grossly inferior school system.

Now I sometimes found myself in tears because it was so hard to try to get through my homework.

But in one sense I was much more fortunate than Ben Carson and other black youngsters today. The shock of being in a school, whose standards were higher than I was able to meet at first, took place in an all-black school in Harlem, so that there was none of the additional complications that such an experience can have for a black youngster in a predominantly white school.

By the time I first entered a predominantly white school, I had already caught up, and had no trouble with the school work. Decades later, in the course of running a research project, I learned that the Harlem school, where I had so much trouble catching up, had an average IQ of 84 back when I was there.

In the predominantly white school to which I later went, I was put in a class for children with IQs of 120 and up, and had no trouble competing with them. But I would have been totally wiped out if I had gone there two years earlier — and who knows what racial hang-ups that might have led to?

Chance plays a large part in everyone’s life. The home in which you are raised is often a big part of luck being on your side or against you. But you don’t need parents with Ph.D.s to make sure that you make the most of your education.

The kinds of things that statisticians can measure, such as family income or parents’ education, are not the crucial things. The family’s attitude toward education and toward life can make all the difference.

Virtually everything was against young Ben Carson, except for his mother’s attitudes and values. But, armed with her outlook, he was able to fight his way through many battles, including battles to control his own temper, as well as external obstacles.

Today, Dr. Benjamin Carson is a renowned neurosurgeon at a renowned institution, Johns Hopkins University. But what got him there was wholly different from what is being offered to many ghetto youths today, much of which is not merely futile but counterproductive.

Note from Mario:  One of the driving forces of my life is the truth that Christ got me out of the ghetto and then He did the greater miracle of getting the ghetto out of me.  I do not condemn social workers and government programs.  What I do condemn is blind allegiance to ideas, methods, and spending by those in authority in the inner city who know better than anyone that they do not work.