Inspector General: Clinton emails had intel from most secretive, classified programs

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gestures during a press conference on June 30, 2012 at the United Nations office, in Geneva. Hillary Clinton said a deal reached between world powers in Geneva would pave the way for the end of the President Bashar al-Assad's regime. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/GettyImages)

Inspector General: Clinton emails had intel from most secretive, classified programs

EXCLUSIVE: Hillary Clinton’s emails on her unsecured, homebrew server contained intelligence from the U.S. government’s most secretive and highly classified programs, according to an unclassified letter from a top inspector general to senior lawmakers.

Fox News exclusively obtained the unclassified letter, sent Jan. 14 from Intelligence Community Inspector General I. Charles McCullough III. It laid out the findings of a recent comprehensive review by intelligence agencies that identified “several dozen” additional classified emails — including specific intelligence known as “special access programs” (SAP).

That indicates a level of classification beyond even “top secret,” the label previously given to two emails found on her server, and brings even more scrutiny to the presidential candidate’s handling of the government’s closely held secrets.

“To date, I have received two sworn declarations from one [intelligence community] element. These declarations cover several dozen emails containing classified information determined by the IC element to be at the confidential, secret, and top secret/sap levels,” said the IG letter to lawmakers with oversight of the intelligence community and State Department. “According to the declarant, these documents contain information derived from classified IC element sources.”

Intelligence from a “special access program,” or SAP, is even more sensitive than that designated as “top secret” – as were two emails identified last summer in a random sample pulled from Clinton’s private server she used as secretary of state. Access to a SAP is restricted to those with a “need-to-know” because exposure of the intelligence would likely reveal the source, putting a method of intelligence collection — or a human asset — at risk. Currently, some 1,340 emails designated “classified” have been found on Clinton’s server, though the Democratic presidential candidate insists the information was not classified at the time.

“There is absolutely no way that one could not recognize SAP material,” a former senior law enforcement with decades of experience investigating violations of SAP procedures told Fox News. “It is the most sensitive of the sensitive.”

Executive Order 13526 — called “Classified National Security Information” and signed Dec. 29, 2009 — sets out the legal framework for establishing special access programs. The order says the programs can only be authorized by the president, “the Secretaries of State, Defense, Energy, and Homeland Security, the Attorney General, and the Director of National Intelligence, or the principal deputy of each.”

The programs are created when “the vulnerability of, or threat to, specific information is exceptional,” and “the number of persons who ordinarily will have access will be reasonably small and commensurate with the objective of providing enhanced protection for the information involved,” it states.

According to court documents, former CIA Director David Petraeus was prosecuted for sharing intelligence from special access programs with his biographer and mistress Paula Broadwell. At the heart of his prosecution was a non-disclosure agreement where Petraeus agreed to protect these closely held government programs, with the understanding “unauthorized disclosure, unauthorized retention or negligent handling … could cause irreparable injury to the United States or be used to advantage by a foreign nation.” Clinton signed an identical non-disclosure agreement Jan. 22, 2009.

Fox News is told that the recent IG letter was sent to the leadership of the House and Senate intelligence committees and leaders of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, as well as the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and State Department inspector general.

Representatives for the ODNI and intelligence community inspector general had no comment.

In a statement, State Department spokesman John Kirby said, “The State Department is focused on and committed to releasing former Secretary Clinton’s emails in a manner that protects sensitive information. No one takes this more seriously than we do.”

The intelligence community IG was responding in his message to a November letter from the Republican chairmen of the Senate intelligence and foreign relations committees that questioned the State Department email review process after it was wrongly reported the intelligence community was retreating from the “top secret” designation.

As Fox News first reported, those two emails were “top secret” when they hit the server, and it is now considered a settled matter.

The intelligence agencies now have their own reviewers embedded at the State Department as part of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) process. The reviewers are identifying intelligence of a potentially classified nature, and referring it to the relevant intelligence agency for further review.

There is no formal appeals process for classification, and the agency that generates the intelligence has final say. The State Department only has control over the fraction of emails that pertain to their own intelligence.

While the State Department and Clinton campaign have said the emails in questions were “retroactively classified” or “upgraded” – to justify the more than 1,300 classified emails on her server – those terms are meaningless under federal law.

The former federal law enforcement official said the finding in the January IG letter represents a potential violation of USC 18 Section 793, “gross negligence” in the handling of secure information under the Espionage Act.

Catherine Herridge is an award-winning Chief Intelligence correspondent for FOX News Channel (FNC) based in Washington, D.C. She covers intelligence, the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security. Herridge joined FNC in 1996 as a London-based correspondent.

More evidence that Hillary will be prosecuted

 BROKE copy

MORE EVIDENCE HILLARY WILL BE PROSECUTED

For months Hillary Clinton had tried to shrug off allegations that she may have committed crimes by hosting potentially classified emails on a private server while secretary of state. She even laughed at the notion that she could be prosecuted.

But now former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has come forward with a shocking legal opinion that could be a game-changer for the Clinton campaign. He believes “that the FBI will recommend prosecution.”

“Simply put, Mrs. Clinton is already in just as bad — or worse — of a legal situation than [General David] Petraeus faced,” Cuccinelli wrote in a recent op-ed for the New York Post. 

Petraeus, former CIA director, pleaded guilty to federal charges for passing classified information to a woman he was having an affair with.

Many political insiders have long believed that Clinton is essentially untouchable. But as Cuccinelli explains, “FBI Director James Comey has a long history of ignoring political pressure” and will almost assuredly recommend charging Clinton for her illegal handling of classified emails.

After that, it would be up to the Justice Department to either ignore the FBI’s recommendations, which could cause embarrassment for the department, or prosecute Clinton. It remains unclear whether President Obama or his administration would try to prevent a prosecution from going forward.

This week, Clinton’s email controversy continued to deepen. In July, State Department officials installed a safe at the office of attorney David Kendall after the government determined some of Clinton’s emails may have contained classified information.

Now they’re admitting the safe wasn’t suitable for so-called top secret, sensitive compartmented information, known as TS/SCI, which the government has said was found in some messages.

This latest development r underscores how even the nation’s diplomatic apparatus didn’t anticipate Clinton would have sent or received such highly sensitive information on her private email server while secretary of state. Questions about her use of such a server have at times dominated her White House run.

Since then, the State Department has indicated through Freedom of Information Act releases of Clinton’s emails that dozens of messages that passed through her private server were later deemed classified, and two emails have since been slapped with a “TK” marking, for the “talent keyhole” compartment, suggesting material obtained by spy satellites, according to the inspector general for the intelligence community. They also were marked “NOFORN,” meaning information that can only be shared with Americans with security clearances.

OBAMA BRINGS IN 1,900 PEOPLE FROM ANOTHER EBOLA NATION

ebola

OBAMA BRINGS IN 1,900 PEOPLE FROM ANOTHER EBOLA NATION

Since an outbreak of Ebola hit the Democratic Republic of the Congo in July, the Obama administration has brought into the U.S. at least 1,900 refugees from the disease-stricken nation, WND has learned.

Required medical screening for refugees may not detect all diseases. The mandatory blood and urine tests for all refugees would not detect Ebola.

The strain of Ebola found in the Congo is slightly different from the virus that has been ravaging West Africa. Researchers have concluded the Congolese outbreak is not connected to the epidemic in West Africa.

The U.S. refugee program this year is on pace to resettle 70,000 citizens, including a limit for the fiscal year of 2014 of 14,000 from Africa, with the State Department giving priority to Congolese refugees.

Since July, at least 1,900 Congolese refugees have been resettled within the U.S., according to statistics provided by the State Department.

A report from the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration shows 944 refugees were admitted from the Congo in July; 628 in August and 338 in September, for a total of 1,910 Congolese refugees.

The exact number of arrivals from the Congo for this month are not yet published. However, the total number of October arrivals so far from the region of Africa, according to the State Department, is 934, with most likely coming from the Congo.

The Congo has had its own outbreak of Ebola that started in late-July reportedly after a hunter brought home an infected bush animal carcass. Since then, 49 people have died in the Congo.

The latest confirmed case of Ebola was Oct. 4, leading experts to believe the disease may have been contained there. There is speculation the World Health Organization could declare the Ebola outbreak in the Congo over by the middle of November if no new cases are presented.

Asked for comment on the issue, State Department Spokesman Daniel Langenkamp referred WND to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Langenkamp stated the CDC’s Immigrant, Refugee, and Migrant Health Branch “has the delegated regulatory authority to oversee the quality of overseas medical exams required of immigrants and refugees coming to the United States.”

The CDC has not returned WND’s phone and email inquiries on the subject for the past two days.

WND asked the CDC’s media relations department whether the agency has taken any extra precautions before admitting Congolese refugees after the Ebola outbreak there, including by providing any specific antibody blood tests.

The CDC’s website explains all refugees admitted to the U.S. must undergo a basic medical examination.

The CDC mandates that all incoming refugees be given a complete blood count with a white blood cell differential, platelets count and a general urinalysis. Newborn infants are also given a metabolic screening, according to different state guidelines.
The CDC website documents the purpose of the blood test is usually to determine the existence of Anemia, a common finding in refugees. Those refugees found to be anaemic will be provided with treatment.

Diagnosing Ebola in an person who has been infected for only a few days is usually difficult, with some remaining asymptomatic for a small period of time.

Specific laboratory tests for Ebola-like antibodies can sometimes detect the disease after a few days of symptoms.

If the CDC is relying in part on a patient’s oral medical history to determine the presence of Ebola, there is concern a refugee, eager to arrive in the U.S., could provide an inaccurate health profile. The refugee can also take medication to reduce a fever prior to a physical examination.

Thomas Duncan, the Liberian who became the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S., reportedly lied about his history of contact with Ebola when he filled out an airport questionnaire in Liberia before boarding a Brussels Airlines flight to Brussels and then a transfer flight to Washington and ultimately to Dallas/Fort Worth.

Congolese refugees are not the only Africans arriving to the U.S. from Ebola-plagues nations. Last week, the Daily Signal reported the U.S. was still providing visas from the three West African countries at the heart of the outbreak.

Meanwhile, according to the State Department’s most recent report to Congress on the U.S. resettlement program, refugee arrivals from Africa “are also strong and are on-pace to exceed our regional projection of 12,000 refugees.”

The report documents the U.S. has given priority to Congolese refugees, as the U.S. has joined the United Nations and international resettlement community in an effort to resettle 50,000 Congolese in coming years.

With additional research by Brenda J. Elliot

 

The image John Kerry WON’T want you to see: U.S. Secretary of State pictured dining with Assad and his wife at Damascus restaurant before war broke out in Syria

The image John Kerry WON’T want you to see: U.S. Secretary of State pictured dining with Assad and his wife at Damascus restaurant before war broke out in Syria

  • Kerry pictured around a small table with his wife and the Assads in 2009
  • Assad and Kerry lean in towards each other, deep in conversation
  • Picture taken in February 2009 when Kerry led a delegation to Syria
  • Kerry yesterday compared Assad to Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein

By ANTHONY BOND

PUBLISHED: 07:53 EST, 2 September 2013 | UPDATED: 11:29 EST, 2 September 2013

This astonishing photograph shows U.S Secretary of State John Kerry having a cosy and intimate dinner with Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad.

Kerry – who compared Assad to Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein yesterday – is pictured around a small table with his wife and the Assads in 2009.

Assad and Kerry – who was then a senator for Massachusetts – lean in towards each other and appear deep in conversation as their wives look on.

A waiter is pictured at their side with a tray of green drinks – which are believed to be lemon and crushed mint.

Cosy: This astonishing photograph shows the U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his wife having an intimate dinner with Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad and his wife in 2009Cosy: This astonishing photograph shows the U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his wife having an intimate dinner with Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad and his wife in 2009
Cosy: This astonishing photograph shows the U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his wife having an intimate dinner with Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad and his wife in 2009Relaxed: A waiter carries over a tray of drinks, which appear to look like cocktails

The picture is believed to have been taken in February 2009 in the Naranj restaurant in Damascus when Kerry led a delegation to Syria to discuss ideas and talk about the way forward for peace in the region.

Despite President Barack Obama taking a step back from his threat to launch an attack by putting  a vote in Congress, his Secretary of State has been outspoken about the dangers posed by the Syrian regime.

He said that Assad ‘has now joined the list of Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein’ in deploying chemical weapons against his population.

He said on Sunday that the U.S. now has evidence that sarin nerve gas was used in Syria and that ‘the case gets stronger by the day’ for a military attack.

Speaking out: US Secretary of State John Kerry last week said the U.S. knows 'with high confidence' the Syrian regime used chemical weapons in an attack last weekSpeaking out: US Secretary of State John Kerry last week said the U.S. knows ‘with high confidence’ the Syrian regime used chemical weapons in an attack

Couple: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is pictured with his British-born wife Asma AssadCouple: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is pictured with his British-born wife Asma Assad
Under pressure: Syrian President Bashar Assad, right, is pictured in a meeting yesterday. Kerry has described him as a ¿thug and murderer¿ Under pressure: Syrian President Bashar Assad, right, is pictured in a meeting yesterday. Kerry has described him as a ‘thug and murderer’During a passionate speech in Washington last Friday, he also called Assad  a ‘thug and murderer’ and urged the world to act as he warned ‘history would judge us all extraordinarily harshly if we turned a blind eye to a dictator’.The U.S. administration put the Syrian chemical weapons death toll on the outskirts of Damascus at 1,429 people – far more than previous estimates – including more than 400 children.

SEVEN MILLION SYRIANS DISPLACED

The head of the U.N. refugee agency in Syria says seven  million Syrians, or almost one-third of the population, have been displaced by the country’s civil war.

Tarik Kurdi said that five million of the displaced are still in Syria while about 2 million have fled to neighboring countries.

He says two million children are among those directly affected by the war.

Kurdi says U.N. assistance has been a ‘drop in the sea of humanitarian need’ and that the funding gap is ‘very, very wide.’ He says international donors have sent less than one-third of the money needed to help those displaced by the war.

More than 100,000 Syrians have been killed since an uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad erupted in 2011.

Kerry has  said he is confident that Congress will give Obama its backing for an attack against Syria, but the former Massachusetts senator also said the president has authority to act on his own if Congress doesn’t give its approval.

Speaking today, Senator John McCain said President Bashar Assad will be ‘euphoric’ about Obama’s decision to wait for Congress over Syria.

One of the loudest critics of the administration’s handling of Syria, McCain criticised Obama in an interview on CBS’s Face the Nation.

Referring to Obama’s famous remark when he said the use of chemical weapons in Syria would cross a red line, McCain said: ‘He didn’t say, “It’s a red line – and by the way I’m going to have to seek the approval of Congress.”

He said it was a red line, and that the United States of America would act.

‘And that’s a big difference, and that’s one of the reasons why this is so problematic.’

The Arizona Republican, who Obama beat for the presidency in 2008, said the President asked him to come to the White House specifically to discuss Syria.
Hundreds died in the alleged chemical attacks on Wednesday, including many women and children

Horrific: Hundreds died in the alleged chemical attacks, including many women and children

Awful: Secretary of State John Kerry said images like these contributed to the U.S. assessment that chemical weapons were used in Syria

Obama is hoping one of Congress’s most intractable foreign policy hawks will help sell the idea of a U.S. military intervention in Syria to a nation deeply scarred by more than a decade of war.

Having announced over the weekend that he will seek congressional approval for military strikes against the Assad regime, the Obama administration is now trying to rally support among Americans and their congressmen and senators.

Today’s meeting with McCain is meant to address concerns of those who feel Obama isn’t doing enough to punish Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government for the chemical weapons attack.

On the other side of the spectrum, some Republican and Democratic lawmakers don’t want to see military action at all.

Obama’s turnabout on Syria sets the stage for the biggest foreign policy vote in Congress since the Iraq war.

Tension:Tension: President Bashar Assad will be ‘euphoric’ about Obama’s decision to wait for Congress over Syria, according to Sen. John McCain
Firm:Firm: Russia’s foreign minister Sergey Lavrov said evidence of alleged chemical weapons use by the Syrian regime presented to Moscow by the U.S. and its allies is ‘absolutely unconvincing’

Meanwhile Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov says the information the U.S. showed Moscow trying to prove that the Syrian regime was behind an alleged chemical weapons attack is ‘absolutely unconvincing.’

Lavrov said today ‘there was nothing specific’ in the evidence presented by Washington: ‘no geographic coordinates, no names, no proof that the tests were carried out by the professionals.’ He did not say what tests he was referring to.

Lavrov say U.S. officials said they cannot share with them all the evidence because some of it is classified.

He did not describe the tests further.

Crisis talks: President Obama and Vice-President Biden meet with Secretary of State John Kerry and National Security Advisor Susan Rice to discuss Syria on SundayCrisis talks: President Obama and Vice-President Biden meet with Secretary of State John Kerry and National Security Advisor Susan Rice to discuss Syria on Sunday
Debate: The President meets national security advisers to discuss possible military actionDebate: The President meets national security advisers to discuss possible military action

Lavrov brushed aside Western evidence of an alleged Syrian regime role. Russia, along with China and Iran, has staunchly backed Assad throughout the conflict.

‘What our American, British and French partners showed us in the past and have showed just recently is absolutely unconvincing,’ Lavrov said at Russia’s top diplomatic school.

‘And when you ask for more detailed proof they say all of this is classified so we cannot show this to you.’

U.N. chemical inspectors toured the stricken areas last week, collecting biological and soil samples, but it is not clear when the will present their findings.

The Syria conflict erupted in March 2011 as an uprising against Assad that quickly transformed into a civil war.

More than 100,000 Syrians have been killed in the conflict.

Kerry describing Syria’s Assad as a thug and murderer