Ted Cruz: Why I am voting for Trump. Why You should too.

Ted Cruz: Why I am voting for Trump.  Why You should too.

 

This election is unlike any other in our nation’s history. Like many other voters, I have struggled to determine the right course of action in this general election.

In Cleveland, I urged voters, “please, don’t stay home in November. Stand, and speak, and vote your conscience, vote for candidates up and down the ticket whom you trust to defend our freedom and to be faithful to the Constitution.”

After many months of careful consideration, of prayer and searching my own conscience, I have decided that on Election Day, I will vote for the Republican nominee, Donald Trump.

I’ve made this decision for two reasons. First, last year, I promised to support the Republican nominee. And I intend to keep my word.

Second, even though I have had areas of significant disagreement with our nominee, by any measure Hillary Clinton is wholly unacceptable — that’s why I have always been #NeverHillary.

Six key policy differences inform my decision. First, and most important, the Supreme Court. For anyone concerned about the Bill of Rights — free speech, religious liberty, the Second Amendment — the Court hangs in the balance. I have spent my professional career fighting before the Court to defend the Constitution. We are only one justice away from losing our most basic rights, and the next president will appoint as many as four new justices. We know, without a doubt, that every Clinton appointee would be a left-wing ideologue. Trump, in contrast, has promised to appoint justices “in the mold of Scalia.”

For some time, I have been seeking greater specificity on this issue, and today the Trump campaign provided that, releasing a very strong list of potential Supreme Court nominees — including Sen. Mike Lee, who would make an extraordinary justice — and making an explicit commitment to nominate only from that list. This commitment matters, and it provides a serious reason for voters to choose to support Trump.

Second, Obamacare. The failed healthcare law is hurting millions of Americans. If Republicans hold Congress, leadership has committed to passing legislation repealing Obamacare. Clinton, we know beyond a shadow of doubt, would veto that legislation. Trump has said he would sign it.

Third, energy. Clinton would continue the Obama administration’s war on coal and relentless efforts to crush the oil and gas industry. Trump has said he will reduce regulations and allow the blossoming American energy renaissance to create millions of new high-paying jobs.

Fourth, immigration. Clinton would continue and even expand President Obama’s lawless executive amnesty. Trump has promised that he would revoke those illegal executive orders.

Fifth, national security. Clinton would continue the Obama administration’s willful blindness to radical Islamic terrorism. She would continue importing Middle Eastern refugees whom the FBI cannot vet to make sure they are not terrorists. Trump has promised to stop the deluge of unvetted refugees.

Sixth, Internet freedom. Clinton supports Obama’s plan to hand over control of the Internet to an international community of stakeholders, including Russia, China, and Iran. Just this week, Trump came out strongly against that plan, and in support of free speech online.

These are six vital issues where the candidates’ positions present a clear choice for the American people.

If Clinton wins, we know — with 100% certainty — that she would deliver on her left-wing promises, with devastating results for our country.

My conscience tells me I must do whatever I can to stop that.

We also have seen, over the past few weeks and months, a Trump campaign focusing more and more on freedom — including emphasizing school choice and the power of economic growth to lift African-Americans and Hispanics to prosperity.

Finally, after eight years of a lawless Obama administration, targeting and persecuting those disfavored by the administration, fidelity to the rule of law has never been more important.

The Supreme Court will be critical in preserving the rule of law. And, if the next administration fails to honor the Constitution and Bill of Rights, then I hope that Republicans and Democrats will stand united in protecting our fundamental liberties.

Our country is in crisis. Hillary Clinton is manifestly unfit to be president, and her policies would harm millions of Americans. And Donald Trump is the only thing standing in her way.

A year ago, I pledged to endorse the Republican nominee, and I am honoring that commitment. And if you don’t want to see a Hillary Clinton presidency, I encourage you to vote for him.

A Clinton win would ensure the most liberal Supreme Court in 80 years

A Clinton win would ensure the most liberal Supreme Court in 80 years

The next president’s picks mean the difference between democracy and tyranny

By Senator Orrin Hatch

The outcome of this November’s election will determine the direction of the Supreme Court for a generation. The next president will have at least one, and as many as four or five, vacancies to fill. There is no more important issue in this election than the Supreme Court.

This is because Supreme Court justices do more than just decide legal cases. To a great extent, they shape the kind of country we have.

Judges come in two basic varieties — those who follow the law as enacted by the people’s representatives, and those who effectively rewrite the law to match their own personal preferences. The first type of judge seeks to implement the law as passed by Congress or state legislatures. The second kind of judge seeks to control the law by making the words in statutes and the Constitution mean what the judge wants them to mean.

The first kind of judge allows the people and their elected representatives to run the country and define our culture, while the second kind of judge prefers to take that role for himself. In this sense, the second type of judge acts as a sort of philosopher-king, deciding what sorts of laws and activities will be allowed, regardless of whether anything in the Constitution or existing law actually addresses the question. Supreme Court decisions restricting religious freedom, greatly expanding federal power, and legalizing abortion and same-sex marriage nationwide offer examples of the second type of judge in action.

The most critical issue in this year’s presidential election is which kind of judge each candidate is likely to appoint.

Donald Trump has said he would appoint the first kind of judge, one who follows the law and doesn’t seek to inject his or her personal views into policy debates. He’s pointed to the late Justice Antonin Scalia as the kind of judge he will select, one committed to faithfully implementing the laws Congress has actually passed. Mr. Trump has backed up that promise with a list of federal and state court judges who, he said, are “representative of the kind of constitutional principles I value.” That list was well received by those of us in the conservative legal movement who believe judges must enforce the law as written.

Hillary Clinton’s record, by contrast, shows that she would appoint a very different kind of judge. When she was a senator, she voted 24 times to filibuster President George W. Bush’s judicial nominees, including current Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, an outstanding jurist. In fact, a comprehensive statistical analysis, based on a widely used measure of judicial ideology, concluded that if Hillary Clinton is elected, “the court may quickly become the most liberal it’s been in at least 80 years.”

No one today can predict with certainty who the next president will appoint to the Supreme Court. But here’s what we do know: The federal judiciary is more powerful than ever, and the Supreme Court will continue to have an enormous impact on our country and on our liberties. The next president will tip the court’s balance, installing a court majority that is either anchored in the text of our statutes and Constitution, or adrift on a sea of “undiscovered” rights and liberal policy ambitions.

We know one other important thing: While the Supreme Court gets much of the attention, the lower federal courts have the last word in the vast majority of cases. During his time in office, President Obama has appointed nearly 40 percent of the entire judiciary. These judges will serve an average of more than 20 years, with the power either to follow or rewrite the law.

A president’s lower court judges frequently serve as a “farm team” for future Supreme Court nominations. Last month, one popular legal blog offered a list of potential Hillary Clinton Supreme Court nominees. Each of the federal judges on the list was either nominated or appointed by President Obama.

Columnist Thomas Sowell hit the nail on the head when he said, “The issue is judges that stick to the law versus judges who ignore the law. That is a huge distinction. It is the difference between living in a self-governing democracy and living under tyrants on the bench.”

Through his or her appointments, the next president will determine whether the federal judiciary respects its proper, limited role in our self-governing democracy, or whether we continue to slide ever further toward judicial tyranny. There is no more important issue in this election.

Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican, is president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate.

The Morality of Voting for Trump

The Morality of Voting for Trump

#NeverTrumpers fails to persuade as Dems focus on helping their candidate win

by Laura Ingraham | Updated 12 Aug 2016 at 1:57 PM

Knowing what we know about Hillary Clinton and her plans for America, and the importance of the Supreme Court, we conservatives have a moral obligation to both oppose her and support Donald Trump.

That’s the choice the NeverTrumpers have made — a decision to do nothing.

This is the sentiment I expressed on Sean Hannity’s television show Thursday that has sent some #NeverTrump conservatives into a tizzy. Ben Shapiro is the latest in a long line of mostly Acela-corridor Republicans who spend much of their days “see-I-told-you-so’ing” about Trump.

Shapiro responded on behalf of Team #NeverTrump Friday in a piece titled “Hannity, Ingraham Say It’s Immoral Not to Vote Trump. Here Are 3 Reasons They’re Wrong,” published in the Daily Wire.

Here are his three arguments, none of which is persuasive:

1. Electing Trump as president will do more damage to the country in the long run because a Trump presidency would be the end of conservatism.
Really? What conservatism is that? The conservatism that ran up huge deficits in the 2000s? The conservatism that encouraged illegal immigration? The conservatism that pushed trade policies that led to the rise of China? The conservatism that rolled over for Obama on issue after issue? The conservatism that does whatever The Wall Street Journal editorial page wants? The conservatism of Jeb Bush, Lindsey Graham, and John McCain? That conservatism won’t be around anymore? Good.

Those are reasons to support Trump, not reasons to fear him. Over the last 25 years, the conservative movement has failed to win a single election against Bill Clinton or Barack Obama. They failed to stop social liberalism. They failed to stop the rise of China. They failed to shrink the federal government, balance the federal budget, return power to the states, or generally do any of the things that GOP voters wanted them to do.

Now, peeved and spiteful that the base no longer trusts them to do almost anything, they are supporting Hillary Clinton — a radical liberal whose 25 years on the national stage have been an absolute disaster for the average American.

If ending this record of failure, and launching a new conservatism that actually tries to help working-class Americans, is one of the consequences of the Trump campaign, then that campaign will have been well worth it.

2. There are costs to supporting Trump if he loses.
They’re worried about conservatism being tainted by Trump? Were they there when the housing bubble collapsed in 2008, and the nation watched in horror as a Republican president struggled to explain why the U.S. economy was in free fall? Were they there when the Bush administration disbanded the Iraqi military, which made stabilizing that sectarian quicksand impossible? Were they there when Republicans were crushed in the 2006 and 2008 elections — in large part because they could make no defense of the Bush administration? Of course they were.

To this day, conservatism is tainted by its association with the Bush administration — and yet the GOP re-took the House in 2010, and re-gained the Senate in 2014. If conservatives can overcome eight years of disastrous policies that left this country crying out for Barack Obama, of all people, they can certainly overcome Donald Trump.

 3. Your vote is a moral instrument, not just an instrument of policy.
Yes, it is. Voting for Trump means that when your country had been in decline for almost two decades, and you had the chance to set the country on a different course, you took it.

Voting for Trump means that when you finally had the chance to end the corrupt and decadent Clinton machine, you took it.

Voting for Trump means that when you had the chance to write in the history books that the country had rejected the last eight years of President Obama, you took it.

Voting for Trump means that when you had the chance to save the First Amendment, and the Second Amendment, and to restore the proper checks and balances that are at risk from another Clinton administration, you took it.

Voting for Trump means that when you had the chance to stand up to pro-China billionaires who make money off of a global system that is rigged in favor of a Chinese dictatorship, and rigged against the American worker, you took it.

Voting for Trump means saying yes to a 15 percent top corporate tax rate, which will boost American wages and jobs.

Voting for Trump means that we know how critical the Supreme Court is and if we lose it, game’s over on many of the policies and principles we’ve been fighting for decades.

Is Trump perfect? Of course not. Do you know how many perfect presidents we’ve had? Zero. In the real world, if you want to be a citizen — and have the responsibilities of a citizen — you have to be a grown-up, and you have to recognize that life presents us with difficult choices.

Voting for Trump means fighting against the ennui and decline that is destroying this country.

Voting for Trump does not mean that you agree with everything he says, or that you never criticize him. It does not mean giving up your right to disagree with him — or even oppose him — when he does something you think is wrong. Does anyone think that Paul Ryan — who is supporting Trump — will simply be a rubber stamp for Trump’s policies? Does anyone think that the numerous GOP Senators who support Trump will blindly follow wherever he leads? Of course not.

The NeverTrumpers like to pretend that Trump’s supporters are weak-minded simpletons who don’t understand how politics works. But the truth is that those of us who support Trump understand all too well the reality of the choice that faces us, and are doing the best we can to save this country.

On the other hand, not voting for Trump — and hoping that he loses — also represents a moral choice:

It means being worried every time you hear a story suggesting that Hillary still faces real hurdles before Election Day and could still lose this.

It means aligning yourself, at least temporarily, with left-wing nightmares Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, and all the other radicals who want Trump to lose.

It means turning a deaf ear to your fellow Americans who can’t take four more years of decline, and who are desperate for new leadership.

It means allowing another four or eight years of flat-lining wages and growth, and high taxes on American businesses.

It means hardening your heart against people those who have spent 40 years trying to stop abortion.

It means rejecting the advice of Ryan, Mitch McConnell, Rudy Giuliani, Newt Gingrich, and the vast majority of elected Republican officials — all of whom are supporting Trump.

It means doing nothing when The New York Times, and The Washington Post, and every other left-wing outlet mocks and ridicules the Trump supporters as racists and bigots.

It means cheering (silently or not) along with every smear and every snide comment that Hollywood and the media can use to attack Trump’s voters.

That’s the choice the NeverTrumpers have made — a decision to do nothing, to wash their hands of the election, of the Republican Party, of the country itself.

That may represent some people’s version of morality. But it’s not mine.